News 14 ‘Work­ing with com­puter on your lap can cause infertility’

Weekly Trust - - News - Risikat Ra­moni, La­gos Dr Kemi Ailoje: Ailoje: Satur­day, Oc­to­ber 27, 2018 Ailoje: Cont’d. on next page

Dr Kemi Ailoje is a Re­pro­duc­tive En­docri­nol­o­gist, Fer­til­ity/IVF Spe­cial­ist and the MD/CEO of Life­link Fer­til­ity Clinic. Her fo­cus over the years has been on women’s health, pro­vid­ing care, sup­port and ad­vo­cacy to women seek­ing ba­bies. She speaks with on infertility man­age­ment and the im­pact of stress on male and fe­male fer­til­ity.

Daily Trust: What is the rate of women af­fected by infertility in Nige­ria? Stud­ies have shown that infertility rate in Nige­ria is about 20 to 25 per cent.

DT: Why do women have secondary infertility and what can be done to help them?

The World Health Or­ga­ni­za­tion (WHO) de­scribes pri­mary infertility as a case in which the woman has never been preg­nant be­fore while with secondary infertility, a woman has been preg­nant be­fore, or had a baby but can­not con­ceive again.

There are emo­tional is­sues at­tached to secondary infertility. Some­times, a woman who has one child wants more chil­dren. The Nige­rian cul­ture puts pres­sure on women to have a child, and when there is one, they want her to have more.

The gen­eral rule is that if a woman is 35 years old or un­der and has been try­ing to con­ceive for one year with­out get­ting preg­nant, or if a woman is over 35 years and she has been hav­ing un­pro­tected in­ter­course for six months (tak­ing into cog­ni­sance her ovu­la­tion), or when a woman is in her 40s, she def­i­nitely needs ad­vice from a fer­til­ity spe­cial­ist.

Many will won­der why a woman should ex­pe­ri­ence secondary infertility. Sev­eral fac­tors in­flu­ence that. As a woman is grow­ing older, her eggs are equally age­ing. She might ex­pe­ri­ence com­pli­ca­tions of the re­pro­duc­tive or­gans; her hus­band could have low sperm count, she could ex­pe­ri­ence life­style changes lead­ing to weight gain and obe­sity, there could be new med­i­cal con­di­tions like di­a­betes and she could have had prior surgery in the pre­vi­ous preg­nancy. Com­pli­ca­tions from the pre­vi­ous preg­nancy could cause in­fec­tion, which pre­vents an­other con­cep­tion.

Women could have chil­dren at any age dur­ing their re­pro­duc­tive years; even post-menopausal women can have chil­dren, us­ing As­sisted Re­pro­duc­tive Tech­nol­ogy. If they don’t have the de­sired num­ber of chil­dren, there are var­i­ous op­tions for them. A woman can do In­trauter­ine In­sem­i­na­tion (IUI) /Ar­ti­fi­cial In­sem­i­na­tion if her tubes are still open and if she still ovu­lates. In In­trauter­ine In­sem­i­na­tion, the eggs are not brought out. Rather, the sperm is gen­tly placed in­side the woman’s womb to in­crease the chances of con­cep­tion. Some­times, timed in­ter­course, de­pen­dent on the monthly ovu­la­tion with In­trauter­ine In­sem­i­na­tion, is a pos­si­ble tech­nique to have ba­bies, whether as a first or sec­ond timer.

DT: Which is the most prevalent be­tween pri­mary and secondary infertility, and who is to be blamed for infertility?

Stud­ies sug­gest that pri­mary infertility is more com­mon than secondary infertility. A lot of stud­ies have also shown that the male fac­tor ac­counts for 40 per cent of the cause of infertility, fe­male fac­tor 40 per cent, un­known fac­tors 10 per cent, un­ex­plained 10 per cent. It is, there­fore, a 50-50 fac­tor that pre­vents a cou­ple from not hav­ing a baby.

Preg­nancy oc­curs when a man with good sperm pa­ram­e­ter meets with a woman with good qual­ity eggs at the pe­riod of ovu­la­tion. Poor qual­ity sperm may be a rea­son why there is no preg­nancy. The fact that a man is ejac­u­lat­ing does not mean he has sperm cells. Sem­i­nal fluid anal­y­sis is the test done to de­ter­mine the qual­ity of the sperm. There are cases where sperm is low in count, motil­ity (ac­tiv­ity) and mor­phol­ogy (forms) and some may not have sperm cells in their ejac­u­late.

No sperm means the man may have quite a large vol­ume of ejac­u­late but there is no sperm cell to form a baby in­side it. You can imag­ine if some­one digs the ground, put no seed and later cov­ers it. Noth­ing will come out un­like some­one who digs the ground, plants a seed, cov­ers and

There are emo­tional is­sues at­tached to secondary infertility. Some­times, a woman who has one child wants more chil­dren. The Nige­rian cul­ture puts pres­sure on women to have a child, and when there is one, they want her to have more

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