Woman Em­pow­er­ment

If Bhutanese women can work in farms, they can work in other oc­cu­pa­tions as well.

Southasia - - CONTENTS - By Noor-Us-Sabah Tauqeer

If Bhutanese women can work in farms, they can work in other oc­cu­pa­tions as well.

Asur­vey con­ducted by the Elec­tion Com­mis­sion of Bhutan showed that over 70 per­cent of women in Bhutan are not in­ter­ested in con­test­ing fu­ture elec­tions. No sin­gle fac­tor is re­spon­si­ble for the rea­sons why women in Bhutan don't want to come out and par­tic­i­pate in pol­i­tics along­side their male coun­ter­parts. As the case is with most gen­der re­lated de­bates, the ra­tio­nales be­hind the not-so-shock­ing re­sults of the survey in Bhutan are var­i­ous and fun­da­men­tally im­preg­nated in the womb of Bhutanese so­ci­ety which is pri­mar­ily pa­tri­ar­chal.

Women in Bhutan have come a long way but they still have more

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