Air France crash de­feats sim­u­la­tors

The Pak Banker - - 6BUSINESS -

Al­most four years af­ter an Air France-KLM Group (AF) plane crashed into the At­lantic killing 228 peo­ple, Air­bus SAS, which built the ill-fated A330 jet­liner, is still seek­ing ways to help pi­lots avoid a re­peat oc­cur­rence.

With flight sim­u­la­tors un­able to ac­cu­rately repli­cate the con­di­tions af­ter an air­craft loses lift, or stalls, whole­sale changes to train­ing regimes may be re­quired, ac­cord­ing to Air­bus test pi­lot Terry Lutz. Other so­lu­tions might in­clude giv­ing more con­trol to com­put­ers even in the con­fused con­di­tions un­der which com­mand cur­rently di­verts to the hu­man crew.

Air France Flight 447 was lost en route from Rio de Janeiro to Paris on June 1, 2009, af­ter its pi­lots took con­trol when the au­topi­lot dis­en­gaged in re­sponse to con­flict­ing speed data later found to have been caused by iced-up sen­sors. “The whole train­ing philoso­phies need to be ad­justed,” Lutz said in a pre­sen­ta­tion at the Royal Aero­nau­ti­cal So­ci­ety in Lon­don. “It’s time for ev­ery­body to take a step back in the train­ing en­vi­ron­ment and de­cide what things are ab­so­lutely cru­cial and need to be main­tained year af­ter year.”

Air France Flight 447 was lost en route from Rio de Janeiro to Paris on June 1, 2009, af­ter its pi­lots took con­trol when the au­topi­lot dis­en­gaged in re­sponse to con­flict­ing speed data later found to have been caused by iced-up sen­sors. A probe by French ac­ci­dent in­ves­ti­ga­tors said the crew lacked the train­ing to re­spond to the sur­prise sce­nario and wors­ened the sit­u­a­tion by opt­ing to lift the plane’s nose in an at­tempt to gain al­ti­tude. While work is un­der way across the in­dus­try to im­prove the models used to run sim­u­la­tors, un­til the feed­back they pro­vide is com­pletely re­li­able their use could cause pi­lots to make poor de­ci­sions.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Pakistan

© PressReader. All rights reserved.