PIZZA AND HAPPENSTANCE

With zero fan­fare and no mar­ket re­search, a new Ital­ian restau­rant opens on, ap­pro­pri­ately enough, pure

Cebu Living - - Food - Bravura

With zero mar­ket re­search and with the der­ring-do of a fool (“murag boang,” Joel puts it), the new ven­ture came about by—in his words—happenstance.

Even the menu is a work in progress, con­stantly evolv­ing based on cus­tomer feed­back. “We added the risotto af­ter we opened be­cause peo­ple were ask­ing for it. And the car­bonara? My Ital­ian chef laughed when I sug­gested we do it the tra­di­tional way…just eggs and parme­san. If peo­ple want cream, we tell the staff to sug­gest the Al­fredo, which we have on the menu as well.”

In keep­ing with his pop­u­lar blog, the at­ten­tion to de­tail in Pi­gafetta sets it apart. “It’s the same con­cept as Zubu­chon. Al­ways the best in­gre­di­ents. No short­cuts. And done the way an Ital­ian mother would, re­ally.” Ca­puto flour for the pizza dough is flown in from Naples from one of only two brands used to make proper Neapoli­tan crust. His car­bonara uses pancetta, not ba­con. And there’s the end­less de­bates on

EVOLV­ING SER­VICE AT PI­GAFETTA MEANS RE­MOV­ING THE WINE GLASSES FROM THE TABLE SET­TINGS AT THEIR TINY MAC­TAN BRANCH. THE GLASSES, HOW­EVER, RE­MAIN

ON THE TA­BLES IN THE BIG­GER BRANCH ALONG ES­CARIO (ABOVE). POLPETTINI IS A POP­U­LAR AN­TIPASTO. THE TRA­DI­TIONAL MEAT­BALLS (POLPETTE) WITH TOMATO

SAUCE SERVED IN A SKIL­LET.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Philippines

© PressReader. All rights reserved.