YOUNG CORN

THOUGH IT DOESN’T OF­FER MUCH FLA­VOR, THIS BABY IS BELOVED BY MANY FOR ITS PLEAS­ANT CRUNCH

F&B World - - SPECIAL FEATURE - Text and Recipe by JOSH BOUTWOOD Photo by NICCO SAN­TOS

Even if we don’t con­sume it ev­ery day, it’s likely that we reg­u­larly come across corn in at least one of its mul­ti­ple forms. It is one of the world’s largest com­modi­ties, with billions of bushels har­vested yearly to be pressed into by-prod­ucts like tooth­paste, as­pirin, and sham­poo, to name just a few. A sta­ble big de­mand re­quires con­stant mas­sive sup­plies, and so farm­ers tend to grow their crops to max­i­mum mat­u­ra­tions to earn a profit. As a re­sult, the younger, more ten­der fresh corn is harder to find.

To pro­duce baby corn, a farmer needs to keep a keen eye and watch out for that per­fect mo­ment be­tween bud­ding and fruit, when the corn is still im­ma­ture and just after the silk starts to ap­pear. This guar­an­tees that it will still be sweet and ten­der, with that beloved tex­tu­ral crunch. Al­though baby corn is eas­ily avail­able in the canned food sec­tion of most su­per­mar­kets, freshly har­vested young corn de­liv­ers a more sat­is­fy­ing ex­pe­ri­ence.

It is cooked much like reg­u­lar corn: sub­merged in salted, boil­ing wa­ter; slapped on a hot grill; or added to a stir-fry. Whichever way you choose, you’ll be re­warded with the corn’s trade­mark sweetness, only much milder.

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