WHAT'S IN YOUR TEA?

BE­YOND THE FLA­VORS, PEO­PLE ARE TAK­ING IN­TER­EST IN THE WHO, WHERE, AND WHYS OF TEA, AND THEIR FIND­INGS ARE SUR­PRIS­INGLY JUST AS FLA­VOR­FUL AS THEIR DRINKS

F&B World - - NEWS -

1. da.u.de

The da.u.de tsaa prod­uct line is a col­lec­tion of pre­mium and hand­crafted teas in­spired by Filipino her­itage. One of the high­lights this year was a part­ner­ship with MaArte to cus­tom­ize three tea blends for MaArTEA, The Penin­sula Manila’s special Au­gust af­ter­noon tea ser­vice. The white pe­ony pa­paya, sam­pa­guita pearl, and mango tea blends are all de­rived from da.u.de’s orig­i­nal prod­uct line.

lovedaude.com

2. Tsaa Laya

Tsaa Laya—a so­cial en­ter­prise that man­u­fac­tures teas us­ing plants and herbs farmed by lo­cal com­mu­ni­ties—has been plan­ning to re­lease new blends this year, and it was per­fect tim­ing for founder Jamir Ocampo when the Mu­seum Foun­da­tion of the Philip­pines ap­proached him to cre­ate cus­tom blends for MaArte at The Pen and MaArTEA. New vari­ants in­clude Sa­gada Tips made from moun­tain herbs sourced in the Cordilleras, Coco Mélange made from co­conut and pan­dan, and Trop­i­cal Sum­mer made from lemon­grass and gin­ger.

face­book.com/tsaalaya

3. Down­toEarth

Down­toEarth has stocked tea leaves and tea ton­ics made from a com­bi­na­tion of ed­i­ble flow­ers and herbs, but this is the first time that the farm is try­ing out a va­ri­ety of lo­cal herbs dis­cov­ered grow­ing wild in the foothills of Dahi­layan in Ca­gayan de Oro and Mt. Ki­tanglad in Bukid­non. The farm de­vel­oped an im­mune booster tea blend made of wild hi­bis­cus, blue ter­nate, key lime, spi­lan­thes, and ama­ranth; a sooth­ing blend made of pur­ple corn, karagum, and hi­erba buena; and a calm­ing tea blend made of blue ter­nate, muti, and kal­abo oregano.

down­toearth.ph

4. Cer­ana Farms

Rosella is an in­dige­nous veg­etable from Bo­tolan, Zam­bales known for its red flow­ers. It is widely avail­able in the area, and most house­holds have a rosella back­yard for their own har­vest. How­ever, the Mac­tal Fam­ily’s Cer­ana Farms were the first to make tea out of it. Founder Ric Mac­tal, who is an en­gi­neer by pro­fes­sion, started farm­ing in 2004, and his fam­ily has been look­ing for ways to in­tro­duce rosella tea and other in­dige­nous prod­ucts to the in­ter­na­tional mar­ket since then.

face­book.com/Cer­anaFarms

5. Ca­cao Cul­ture Farms

Ken­neth and Shiela Reyes-Lao’s ca­cao prod­ucts have be­come a hit among lo­cals, but their ca­cao tea has left a stronger im­pres­sion. Made from fer­mented and dried ca­cao beans, which are then roasted and win­nowed at the ca­cao farm, it’s sold in loose-leaf form for now, but the Reyes-Laos are look­ing to pro­duce a tea bag ver­sion along with other ca­cao tea blends that will be avail­able in the mar­ket soon.

ca­cao­cul­ture­farms.com face­book.com/ca­cao­cul­ture­farms

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