TWIST­ING TRA­DI­TIONS

CON­SUMERS ARE DRAWN TO CLAS­SIC DISHES WITH EX­OTIC, INDULGENT, AND BOLDER TWISTS

F&B World - - SPECIAL FEATURE - Text by JANICA BALASOLLA Photo by JELLO ESPINO Food styling by DEN­NIS LO

Clas­sic dishes will al­ways have a place in the menu. They have be­come a source of in­spi­ra­tion for chefs and restau­ra­teurs in con­cep­tu­al­iz­ing their menus while bring­ing com­fort to cus­tomers. How­ever, these dishes tend to be­come unim­pres­sive when served repet­i­tively over a given amount of time. That is why var­i­ous restau­rants are giv­ing their own twists to clas­sic dishes in or­der to keep the menu di­verse and fresh, leav­ing last­ing impressions to cus­tomers. Here are some tech­niques restau­ra­teurs can do to rein­vent dishes.

Fu­sion cui­sine Com­bin­ing two dif­fer­ent cuisines turns a clas­sic dish into a whole new fare. For in­stance, the sa­vory Latin- Amer­i­can taste of bur­rito com­bined with the clean and crisp fla­vor of Ja­panese fresh sushi re­sults in a Sushirrito. An­other taste­ful ex­am­ple is adding Korea’s kim­chi for the ex­tra spice and tex­ture to a Mex­i­can que­sadilla. The tangy and spicy fla­vor of the kim­chi greatly com­pli­ments the fresh and creamy gua­camole. The Kim­chi Que­sadilla can also be paired with grilled chicken or shrimp for added taste.

Hooked on hybrids Mix­ing to­gether two or three dif­fer­ent food for­mats to de­velop a to­tally new con­cept can spark in­ter­est among cus­tomers. Since the birth of Do­minique Ansel’s Cronut in 2013, many in­ter­est­ing com­bi­na­tions have emerged like the Cookie Shot (cookie shot glass filled with vanilla milk) and Brook­ies (brownie and cookie). No need to look over­seas, you can find in­spi­ra­tion and play around with lo­cal hybrids that are also worth the hype. For in­stance, the Siopao Burger is ba­si­cally a play on the clas­sic Amer­i­can burger served in Man­tou buns. Other lo­cal hybrids to try out are the Kat­cino, a sa­vory mas­ter­piece com­bin­ing to­cino and chicken katsu, and leche flan pie for the iconic Filipino dessert with a twist.

New al­ter­na­tives Adding or sub­sti­tut­ing in­gre­di­ents can give a dif­fer­ent spin to usual fa­mil­iar fla­vors. An ex­am­ple can be re­plac­ing gabi in Sini­gang with ube, for a dif­fer­ent taste and a pop of color to the soup. You can also try putting a lo­cal twist on Ital­ian pasta by us­ing cooked sisig and poached egg as top­pings.

While ex­per­i­ment­ing on fares and fla­vors may be ex­cit­ing, it’s im­por­tant not to go over­board as it might re­sult in an un­fa­mil­iar taste that may dis­ap­point and drive away cus­tomers. Tweak your way grad­u­ally when mar­ry­ing or re­plac­ing taste and fla­vors. De­light cus­tomers by of­fer­ing them an all-time fa­vorite with an ex­hil­a­rat­ing twist.

Im­prove your chances of suc­cess in rein­vent­ing a clas­sic dish by us­ing qual­ity in­gre­di­ents from Great Food Solutions (GFS), the food­ser­vice arm of San Miguel Pure Foods. GFS has an ex­ten­sive va­ri­ety of prod­ucts that makes them an ideal part­ner for your restau­rant needs, mak­ing them one of the trusted names in food in­no­va­tion.

For more in­for­ma­tion on Great Food Solutions visit www.great­food­so­lu­tions.com and face­book.com/great­food­so­lu­tions or call (02) 632-2000.

(From top) Toasted Siopao Burger us­ing Chef’s Se­lec­tion An­gus Burger Patty; Leche Flan Pie us­ing Magnolia Brown Eggs and Magnolia Full Cream Milk; Sisig Car­bonara Pasta topped with Pure­foods Siz­zling Sisig

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