INA RAY­MUNDO,

THE MOST MIL­LEN­NIAL AS­PECT OF

FHM (Philippines) - - PULSE -

per­ceived as an ef­fect of the ex­pe­ri­ence she’s gained through the years.

“I’m so in touch with my in­ner sex­u­al­ity,” she claims. “I’ve al­ways had it since I was a lit­tle girl. I’m not kid­ding. I’m a very sex­ual per­son, but I man­age it. I’ve al­ways been aware of it. I feel like the more I age, it be­comes stronger. It’s in me. Peo­ple no­tice my sen­su­al­ity in the way I move or in the way I flip my hair, even when I’m not to­tally con­scious of it. It’s def­i­nitely not a weak­ness. That is a kind of power. I’ve never been in de­nial of it. But re­mem­ber that you al­ways have to use it wisely. Don’t abuse it, but don’t ig­nore or feel ashamed about it [ei­ther]. You can have that power and no one even needs to know that you’re in pos­ses­sion of it.”

That’s the sort of elo­quence and in­tel­li­gence ev­ery­one should as­pire to— re­gard­less of which gen­er­a­tion you be­long. I told her, if you feel that it makes you happy, then you should do it. But of course, you shouldn’t force other women to do it as well just be­cause you want to fight for it. That’s not cool. To each his own. It has to be done for the right rea­sons and we should never pres­sure other girls to do it when they don’t want to.”

Al­though she doesn’t claim to be a fem­i­nist of any sort, the way in which she takes own­er­ship of her in­nate sex­u­al­ity is highly evolved and can be how­ever, is her atyp­i­cal mod­ern ap­proach to fe­male sex­u­al­ity. In an age where key­board fem­i­nism has taken cen­ter­stage, some­times skew­ing the true mean­ing of what it means to be a real fem­i­nist, Ina’s be­liefs are grounded on rec­og­niz­ing her in­her­ent sen­su­al­ity and nur­tur­ing it, bran­dish­ing it like a sharp­ened blade only when it doesn’t hurt other women in the process. And this is a phi­los­o­phy she isn’t afraid of pass­ing on to her kin.

“Women nowa­days are so strong and brave,” she ob­serves, re­call­ing a re­cent con­ver­sa­tion she had with one of her more opin­ion­ated daugh­ters. “The other night, my daugh­ter asked me if I thought it was okay for women to show their chests the way men do. She said that she thought it wasn’t fair that women get judged for show­ing their boobs and yet men don’t. My daugh­ter, she thinks like that, and I’m proud of her.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Philippines

© PressReader. All rights reserved.