A P10,000 BUD­GET SHORT FILM

We didn’t cheat by cast­ing fam­ily mem­bers in it

FHM (Philippines) - - Contents -

With so many good in­die films com­ing out re­cently, we’re sure that the bold idea of mak­ing your own film has crossed your mind. You get all hyped at the idea of fi­nally get­ting that kick­ass plot that’s been play­ing in­side your head into some­thing real you can show to other peo­ple only to have it im­me­di­ately de­nied by your pes­simistic logic and the fi­nan­cial re­al­ity that you don’t have the funds to make it hap­pen.

We’re here to prove to you that your big screen dreams (or in this case, on­line vi­ral­ity) aren’t im­pos­si­ble if you know how to bud­get wisely, think out­side the box, and have the

ka­pal ng mukha to ask help from your ex­ceed­ingly more ta­lented friends. So get off your ass and be­come the best damn pro­ducer ever.

1 SCOPE AND LIM­I­TA­TION

A great script is the back­bone of al­most all mem­o­rable films, and it ac­tu­ally even plays a big­ger role when it comes to bud­get film­mak­ing. The plot of the film will dic­tate most of how your bud­get will be al­lo­cated for the en­tire pro­duc­tion so you bet­ter not have any ex­plod­ing Benz’s or build­ings in your sto­ry­line. Think small and artsy. You’d be sur­prised at the ten­sion a sin­gle shot in an en­closed room can have with proper light­ing, mu­sic, and di­a­logue (or the lack thereof). Bud­get loss: P1,000 for mis­cel­la­neous props, P9,000 left

2 CHAR­AC­TERS

One of the best ways to cut cost is to lessen the char­ac­ters needed for the film and if you have to have ex­tras, get your friends to do it so you don’t have to pay for their tal­ent fees. Also, have your char­ac­ters in a sit­u­a­tion where you wouldn’t have to use ex­trav­a­gant props and out­fits, heck if you can get your char­ac­ters naked, you’re sure to get a lot more views! Bud­get loss: Two peo­ple, P1,000 each, with free lunches, P7,000 left

3 TIME AND PLACE

Deal­ing with lo­gis­tics has al­ways been a pain in the ass and re­serv­ing a pri­vate place for a shoot will be way above your price range un­less you get a mir­a­cle x-deal. it’s bet­ter to go guerilla shoot­ing out­doors and pub­lic places or call in some fa­vors with your rich kid friends with nice houses/of­fices you can squeeze in some shoot­ing time. But be­fore any­thing, al­ways check if you have to ask the lo­cal gov­ern­ment for a per­mit if you want to shoot there. Weird but that’s how some places roll so you bet­ter be safe just in case. un­less you want your pro­duc­tion day cut short by the lo­cal popo. Bud­get loss: p0.00, p7,000 left

TIP #1 HAVE YOUR FILM SCREENED By LE­GIT FILM HOUSES LIKE CANNES SHORT FILM CIR­CLE TO GET YOUR FILM’S CRED UP. TIP #2 MAKE A FACE­BOOK PAGE FOR YOUR FILM WHERE YOU POST SHARE­ABLE SCREENCAPS FROM YOUR FILM TO HYPE IT UP EVEN BE­FORE IT RE­LEASES.

3 THE TEAM

the key to cost cut­ting is to have a lot of kind, ta­lented friends you can bola your way into do­ing things pro bono. Be pre­pared to fill any va­cant po­si­tions you think you can take on. Spend your bud­get on the things you have ab­so­lutely no ac­cess to tal­en­t­wise to se­cure the qual­ity of your film. re­mem­ber, there are no small jobs, only small tal­ent fees. Bud­get loss: 5000.00 php, 2000.00 php left TIP #3 IN­VITE ME­DIA PEO­PLE TO WATCH PRE-SCREEN­INGS OF YOUR FILM FOR FREE SO THEY CAN RE­VIEW AND TALK ABOUT IT IN THEIR PUB­LI­CA­TIONS AND BLOGS! Prob­a­bly, the most ne­glected parts of a film are the mu­sic and sound ef­fects used. You can’t re­ally blame peo­ple for not notic­ing though, be­cause when a film has re­ally good sound it flows nat­u­rally with the film as you watch. There are a lot of free to use sound clips on Sound­cloud and Youtube by awe­some artists you could use in your film. Also, if your film makes use of a lot of di­a­logue, hav­ing the ac­tors re-dub the film in a con­trolled en­vi­ron­ment like a stu­dio can do won­ders for the voice clar­ity of the fi­nal prod­uct to make your film’s sound to feel ex­tra crisp and le­git. Bud­get loss: P2000, no bud­get left

DI­REC­TOR EX­EC­U­TIVE PRO­DUCER WRITER HEAD Of LO­GIS­TICS CAST­ING DI­REC­TOR ACT­ING COACH cof­fee ER­RAND BOY

POST-PRO­DUC­TION

DI­REC­TOR Of PHO­TOG­RA­PHY

MU­SI­CAL SCORE

GLAM TEAM

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