AMD Ryzen 7 1800X

Ryzen from the Ashes

HWM (Philippines) - - Test - By Ch­ester Labaco

It’s been sev­eral years (4 to 5 years) since AMD has re­leased any CPUS. Of course, we can’t for­get their APUS that have been mak­ing them rel­e­vant in the lower-end mar­ket of PC gam­ing. Any­one who’s a com­puter en­thu­si­ast, how­ever, knows that to get the best gam­ing and pro­duc­tiv­ity per­for­mance needed to get an Intel CPU. Intel’s dom­i­nance over the higher-end spectrum of the CPU mar­ket is nearly com­ing to a close.

The flag­ship of AMD’S Ryzen 7 range, the 1800X boasts a Base Clock speed of 3.6GHZ that can boost up to 4.0GHZ. This might seem low com­pared to the main­stream of­fer­ings that Intel has, but com­pared to the 4-core, 8-thread 7700K of the blue team, the 1800X is equipped with eight cores and 16 threads. Its TDP has been low­ered as well com­pared to the pre­vi­ous gen­er­a­tion of AMD CPUS (like the 9590) to 95W.

We won’t go into de­tails about the new Zen ar­chi­tec­ture. If you want to learn more about Zen, head over to our web­site.

AMD’S AM3 and AM3+ plat­form have been with us for sev­eral years now. AMD’S Zen ar­chi­tec­ture will be look­ing for­ward to a new plat­form in the form of the AM4 plat­form.

The brand new chipset sup­ports all the bells and whis­tles that a top-end PC should have such as NVME PCIE 3.0 x4, SATA III, SATA Ex­press, Dual Chan­nel DDR4, na­tive USB 3.1 Gen2, and more.

Be­fore we get into the bench­marks, AMD has ad­vised that some bench­mark­ing soft­ware (such as AIDA64 and Sisoft San­dra) are yet to be up­dated to fully sup­port the new Ryzen CPUS.

To see how AMD’S new CPU per­forms, we equipped it with a Gi­ga­byte AX370 Gam­ing 5, 16GB of DDR4 RAM clocked at 3000MHZ, an ADATA SP920SS 256GB, an NVIDIA Ge­force GTX 960, and a Noc­tua U12S SEAM4 cooler.

The cool­ing system isn’t ex­actly the great­est since Am4-com­pat­i­ble cool­ers at the time of this re­view are still yet to be found in the lo­cal mar­ket. We were also un­for­tu­nate in the sil­i­cone lot­tery since we were only able to push our 1800X to 4.0GHZ at 1.45v. Any higher and the test system would just crash while bench­mark­ing.

Now, onto the bench­marks. We ran CPUZ’s bench­mark­ing tool where the 1800X was able to get a score of 2306 in the sin­gle-threaded test, while it was able to reach 20062 in the multi-threaded test.

For com­pres­sion tests, we ran WINRAR x64 where the Ryzen CPU was able to reach 10,437Kbps.

In cal­cu­la­tions, it was able to process wprime v2.10’s 32M test in just 4.2 sec­onds and its 1024M test in 101.434 sec­onds.

In terms of ren­der­ing ca­pa­bil­i­ties, the 1800X per­form well reach­ing a score of 1739 in Cinebench R15 while it was able to ren­der a scene in POV-RAY 3.7 in just 79.43 sec­onds.

1080p gam­ing is a bit of a hit for the 1800X. It was able to get a score of 6577 in 3Dmark Fire Strike com­pared to the Intel’s i77700K’s 7063.

AMD has noted that there is a 20°C off­set in tem­per­a­ture read­ings at the time of the re­view. While over­clocked, the CPU reached a peak of 77°C. This is im­pres­sive es­pe­cially if you take into ac­count that we’re not us­ing a high-end CPU cooler.

De­spite its lack­lus­ter per­for­mance in lower res­o­lu­tion gam­ing, we still be­lieve that the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X hits the sweet spot at PHP 27,000. If you’re only play­ing games at 1080p, you might want to look at Intel’s of­fer­ing or wait for the more budget-friendly Ryzen 5 se­ries. If you’re a per­son that does gam­ing, ren­der­ing, and other mul­ti­threaded tasks, the Ryzen 7 1800X is for you. Like a phoenix, AMD has Ryzen from its ashes.

CON­CLU­SION If you’re only play­ing games at 1080p, you might want to look at Intel’s of­fer­ing or wait for the more budget-friendly Ryzen 5 se­ries. If you that do gam­ing, ren­der­ing, and other multi-threaded tasks, the Ryzen 7 1800X is for you. Like a phoenix, AMD has Ryzen from its ashes.

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