CROSTA PIZZE­RIA

You had me a “Sour­dough Crust”.

Let’s Eat - - WHAT'S INSIDE - WORDS BY SPANKY HIZON ENRQUEZ

San Fran­cisco’s most fa­mous bak­ery is Boudin, and their most pop­u­lar prod­uct, world­wide, is their sour­dough bread. The bak­ery’s be­come a ma­jor tourist at­trac­tion in the city’s Fish­er­man’s Wharf. Sour­dough of all shapes and sizes can be bought as gifts to be brought home to all points of the com­pass. I have first­hand ex­pe­ri­ence: my hand car­ried lug­gage when I fly out of SFO is in­evitably jam-packed with the loaves.

When I found out that Ingga Chua and Tommy Woud­wyk’s “Crosta Pizze­ria” used a sour­dough crust, I was in­trigued, to say the least. Ex­cited and giddy would be more an ac­cu­rate de­scrip­tion of my re­ac­tion, ac­tu­ally. As any baker knows, the se­cret of ev­ery sour­dough’s suc­cess is the “starter”, the mother dough. Boudin’s, for ex­am­ple, is over 150 years old; it is, in a very lit­eral sense, alive, thanks to the ever fer­ment­ing yeast that gives the bread its unique fla­vor and crusty, bub­bly, chewy tex­ture. Crosta’s starter is much younger, but it’s ma­tur­ing quickly. I could taste the dis­tinct tang of the sour­dough in the pizza. Loved ev­ery bite. And here’s a pro tip: eat the part of the pizza with the top­pings first, but save the crusty edges. Take them home, pop ‘em in the toaster, and slather with but­ter. You’re wel­come.

PHO­TOS BY GABBY CANTERO

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‘Sh­roomed Out Pep­per­on­ley Crosta at The So­cial The Ba­sic Bitch

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