DULO

The spirit of Malate’s quin­tes­sen­tial bar, Pen­guin, lives on at this new artists’ haven.

Let’s Eat - - WHAT'S INSIDE - WORDS BY SPANKY HIZON EN­RIQUEZ

The uni­verse has a way of right­ing it­self. There’s a grand plan at work, and some may at­tribute it to the strict laws of sci­ence and oth­ers to the grand mys­ter­ies of faith, but ei­ther way, it’s all based on a sys­tem of be­liefs. Par­don the Neil deGrasse Tyson mo­ment of re­flec­tion, but when I first walked into Dulo, the Pobla­cion’s brand new multi-hy­phen­ate venue (it’s a bar-restau­rant-cof­fee shop-art gallery-events space-and prob­a­bly more) I felt the same good vibes as I did when I first en­tered Malate’s Pen­guin a score and seven years ago.

And when I spoke with one of Dulo’s man­ag­ing part­ners, Alexa Arabejo, a few min­utes into our con­ver­sa­tion, she men­tioned, un­bid­den, that based on her re­search, the clos­est thing to her new estab­lish­ment was the revered Pen­guin of yore. It was a mo­ment of epiphany. Kin­dred souls sep­a­rated not by dis­tance, but by decades. Alexa and her co-con­spir­a­tor and co-owner, Rae Lim Pineda, re­mind me of the free spir­its—the artists, the creatives, the icon­o­clasts—who fre­quented Pen­guin. The uni­verse heard my plea, it seems, for the res­ur­rec­tion of my fa­vorite bar ever. And it even gave a bonus. Pen­guin was never known for its food, but its spir­i­tual suc­ces­sor’s one of the best new restau­rants in the area. It’s time to ven­ture into the far end of the Pobla­cion, and dis­cover the dis­tinct, di­verse de­lights of Dulo.

PHO­TOS BY GABBY CANTERO

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1 En­trees and Mains

2 Pork Belly Rice Bowl

3 Chicken Bao

4 Dulo In­te­ri­ors 04

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