Old World Liv­ing

A home filled with ex­quis­ite an­tiques is set by Mia Cabawatan-lozada for a grand din­ner ban­quet

Philippine Tatler Homes - - CONTENTS -

WORDS MARGA MANLAPIG PHO­TOG­RA­PHY ALDWIN ASPILLERA ART DI­REC­TION & PRO­DUC­TION MIA BOR­ROMEO

The gated com­mu­nity of Ur­daneta Vil­lage gives off a dis­tinc­tive sub­ur­ban vibe that is quite un­usual as it is right in the heart of Makati’s cen­tral busi­ness district. Homes here are pock­ets of seren­ity and com­fort amidst the ur­ban sprawl and chaos.

One home, in par­tic­u­lar, also stands as one fam­ily’s tes­ta­ment to gen­teel liv­ing and en­ter­tain­ing in a truly grand style.

Here, one is greeted by an as­sort­ment of arte­facts and an­tiques care­fully col­lected and cu­rated by two gen­er­a­tions of the fam­ily for the bet­ter part of four decades. The cur­rent owner ex­plains that this col­lec­tion was started by her fa­ther who trav­elled the world ex­ten­sively through­out the 1970s.

“My fa­ther loved beau­ti­ful things,” she says. “He would go to Hong Kong and Europe just to at­tend auc­tions so that he could build up a beau­ti­ful and price­less col­lec­tion of his own.”

PE­RIOD PIECES

Many peo­ple would be con­tent to col­lect paint­ings or other dec­o­ra­tive baubles such as Mu­rano glass mille­fiore pa­per­weights, but this fam­ily takes pride in full suites of matched pe­riod fur­ni­ture from France and the United King­dom, along with such cu­rios as pieces of fine porce­lain, crys­tal, jade, ivory and sil­ver.

The cur­rent owner ad­mits that the sil­ver­ware is her favourite out of all the col­lec­tions, cit­ing that it may have his­tor­i­cal sig­nif­i­cance. “Some of them date back to 1800s and were owned by fa­mous peo­ple,” she says. “I al­ways imag­ine how op­u­lent and in­ter­est­ing [the orig­i­nal own­ers’] lives must have been.”

Per­haps some mea­sure of the orig­i­nal own­ers’ psy­che has spilled over into the house as it ex­udes an eclec­tic yet har­mo­nious aura given the di­verse origins of the fur­ni­ture and ob­jets d’art within. Ori­en­tal an­tiques and vases pair beau­ti­fully with late-baroque and Re­gency-era chairs from France in the main sit­ting room; an ex­ten­sive se­lec­tion of French and English porce­lain is like­wise on dis­play both in cases as well as on the din­ing ta­ble for merry gath­er­ings with fam­ily and friends.

Most homes owned by avid col­lec­tors of art and fine fur­nish­ings tend to give off a rather aus­tere, even for­bid­ding am­bi­ence that is not con­ducive to con­vivial en­ter­tain­ing. This house, sur­pris­ingly, does not and

even in­vites guests to come in and en­joy com­fort­able mo­ments in well-ap­pointed sur­round­ings. For this, the ser­vices of a flo­ral de­signer who can eas­ily match the over­all el­e­gance of the house with the ta­ble set­ting for an event are more than wel­come.

LA MAITRESSE DES FLEURS

Bloom­woods Flow­er­shop is a name fa­mil­iar to those who ad­here to high stan­dards with re­gard to en­ter­tain­ing both at home and on an in­sti­tu­tional level. The brain­child of event stylist and flo­ral sculp­ture artist Mia Cabawatan-lozada is known for unique and in­tri­cate flo­ral ar­range­ments to grace some of the coun­try’s most prom­i­nent events, in­clud­ing the an­nual Tatler Ball.

With her em­pha­sis on draw­ing to­gether var­i­ous el­e­ments into har­mo­nious ar­range­ments that em­body the spirit of both an event and its venue, Cabawatan­lozada is the perfect choice for craft­ing lux­u­ri­ous cen­tre­pieces and place set­tings that per­fectly cap­ture an “East Meets West” theme that is in keep­ing with the over­all ap­pear­ance of the house.

As Cabawatan-lozada her­self states, “I am in­spired by art, clas­sic pieces like old­fash­ioned wood carv­ings and sil­ver­ware and, of course, Mother Na­ture.”

DIPLO­MACY BY DE­SIGN

Given that many of the pieces in the own­ers’ col­lec­tion are ei­ther French or were pur­chased in France, Cabawatan-lozada’s dream din­ner set­ting was laid out for no less than Em­manuel Macron, the re­cently-elected Pres­i­dent of France, and his wife Brigitte.

“I chose them be­cause I wanted to know more about the lat­est power cou­ple,” she en­thuses. “Plus, my grand ta­ble set­ting re­flects the cur­rent trend, which adds an Asian twist to clas­sic Euro­pean style.”

In or­der to match the or­nate carv­ings of the gilded wooden Baroque-era din­ing ta­ble, the ro­bust colour scheme of the room and the dé­cor which in­cludes an ex­quis­ite blue and white dec­o­ra­tive panel and a shim­mer­ing

crys­tal chan­de­lier, the de­signer chose a some­what muted pal­ette to com­ple­ment the space along with a pure white schema for the place set­tings.

Here, a white ta­ble-scape catches the eye, one laid out with clas­sic Nori­take plates and cups, as well as glass wa­ter gob­lets from Arc. The own­ers’ col­lec­tion of sil­ver cut­lery—some by flat­ware leg­end Christofle—adds a glim­mer that ac­cents the pu­rity of the colours.

Even the flow­ers are a salute to the west as Cabawatan-lozada com­bines fluffy, cloud­like hy­drangeas with spring blos­soms in shades of pink and lilac like hy­acinths, pe­onies and del­phini­ums. These are art­fully ar­ranged in cylin­dri­cal ori­en­tal vases and gin­ger jars to evoke a har­mo­nious meet­ing of cul­tures in a sin­gle space. The flow­ers were specif­i­cally se­lected to re­flect the gen­til­ity and old-world el­e­gance of the house and the col­lec­tions it holds.

With re­gard to this par­tic­u­lar ar­range­ment, Cabawatan-lozada says, “All of my events and ta­ble set­tings are unique in their own way. I have done a lot of spe­cial din­ner and lunch par­ties for am­bas­sadors and celebri­ties, but It is the un­der­stated grandeur and Old World charm of this house that sets the ar­range­ments apart from any­thing I’ve ever done.”

Ori­en­tal an­tiques and vases pair beau­ti­fully with late-baroque and Re­gency-era chairs from France in the main sit­ting room

OP­PO­SITE A col­lec­tion of pe­riod

sil­ver ac­quired at auc­tion in London

fam­ily heir­looms

FROM LEFT

A dec­o­ra­tive blue and white wall panel mir­rors the porce­lain vases on the ta­ble; a pro­fu­sion of pink hy­drangeas, which sym­bol­ise heart­felt

emo­tions and grat­i­tude, stand out against the clas­sic blue and white

scheme

OP­PO­SITE

A row of blue and white gin­ger jars and vases line the con­sul ta­ble against a

gilded mirror of Glory AND

Grandeur

THIS PAGE The liv­ing room fea­tures

French pe­riod fur­ni­ture and col­lec­tions of an­tiques ac­cu­mu­lated through

the years

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