FINE LINES.

IN THE HEART OF A CITY CEN­TER IS A FUR­NI­TURE DE­SIGNER’S APART­MENT FILLED WITH STRIK­ING ART­WORK AND A CLAS­SIC COL­LEC­TION OF CHAIRS

Real Living (Philippines) - - Realliving -

This art-filled city apart­ment is a vi­sion in white walls with ac­cents of black, gold, and tex­tured browns.

As one of the most cos­mopoli­tan cities in the world, Cape Town, South Africa, is a buzzing play­ground. In re­cent years, it has un­der­gone a mas­ter­ful ur­ban trans­for­ma­tion. Once-de­serted of­fice build­ings have been con­verted into pol­ished apart­ment blocks, scruffy old ware­houses now play host to world-class eater­ies, and for­mer dingy dives are now ar­ti­sanal gin bars, fair-trade cof­fee shops, and cronut-serv­ing bak­eries.

It is no sur­prise, then, that many of the city’s de­sign tal­ents have es­chewed sub­ur­ban bliss for in­ner city life, and Liam Mooney is no ex­cep­tion. A suc­cess­ful fur­ni­ture de­signer and re­spected in­te­ri­ors ex­pert, Liam loves to wel­come friends into his rest­ful re­treat: an open-plan apart­ment sit­u­ated in a ren­o­vated, mixed-use Art Deco build­ing on Green­mar­ket Square, one of Cape Town’s busiest tourist hubs. “When I first saw it, I was im­me­di­ately taken with the orig­i­nal wooden win­dows, high ceil­ings, open plan space, and the fact that there are two ter­races,” he says.

Liam first lived in the then two-bed­room apart­ment for a short while be­fore propos­ing a struc­tural change to his land­lord. “I didn’t need a sec­ond bed­room, but I felt that a din­ing area was es­sen­tial since I love en­ter­tain­ing.” So out went a dry wall, and in its place, space for a ta­ble that’s big enough for din­ners. “I love to en­ter­tain, but my friends know that af­ter I eat, I sleep, so if I have peo­ple dur­ing the week, it’s usu­ally a dine-and-dash sce­nario,” he says with a laugh.

Removing the wall opened up the home and let in an abun­dance of nat­u­ral light. From the nat­u­ral tex­tured wall­pa­per through­out the main liv­ing area to many of his orig­i­nal art­works, there’s no doubt Liam has added a fab­u­lously el­e­gant edge to the space. “The open-plan na­ture of the space makes it so ver­sa­tile and ideal for me, since I love to shift things around on a reg­u­lar ba­sis,” says Liam. “I like to put things to­gether that don’t nec­es­sar­ily work ‘on pa­per,’ but be­cause I love them, they work for the way I want to live—and that’s with things I love and which have a story.”

While the world out­side his win­dows is a ca­coph­ony of color and ac­tiv­ity, Liam’s home is a monochro­matic con­trast. “Gen­er­ally, I like a more neu­tral pal­ette—it just ages bet­ter. Color is im­por­tant to me, but I like darker, more somber col­ors than brights,” he says. The home’s mod­ern pal­ette of black and white is off­set by nat­u­ral tex­tures and tones, the oc­ca­sional metal­lic fin­ish, and an im­pres­sive col­lec­tion of con­tem­po­rary art­works by some of South Africa’s best tal­ents, many of whom are Liam's friends.

pho­tog­ra­phy GREG COX/BUREAUX.CO.ZA styling SVEN ALBERDING/BUREAUX.CO.ZA words VICKI SLEET/BUREAUX.CO.ZA

Home­owner Liam Mooney’s eye for care­ful cu­ra­tion is fault­less in this mini gallery space, com­plete with vel­vet Mid-cen­tury chairs and a por­trait of Pi­casso.

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