LOCKER ROOM TALK

Scout - - SQUEAKY CLEAN -

Some of the most common myths about locker room habits also hap­pen to be the most ab­surd. We bust the top three most popular ones:

Q: Will I get mus­cle spasms if I jump in the shower after a work­out?

A: Ac­cord­ing to In­ter­na­tional Triathlon Union- cer­ti­fied coach Kaye Lopez, there is noth­ing wrong with tak­ing a shower, es­pe­cially a cold one after a work­out be­cause it helps mus­cle re­cov­ery. In fact, ice baths are pro­vided at race events for this spe­cific pur­pose.

Q: Will us­ing de­odor­ant give me breast can­cer?

A: For the record, men can get breast can­cer, too. This ru­mor sur­faced at almost the same time e- mail was in­vented and has been pretty per­va­sive. So far, re­search here is in­con­clu­sive. How­ever, there is a con­cern that since alu­minum pre­vents sweat­ing, which is a nat­u­ral way of purg­ing tox­ins, us­ing anti- per­spi­rants that con­tain alu­minum may lead to neu­ro­tox­i­c­ity.

Per­son­ally, the more chem­i­cals I can do with­out, the bet­ter. Hu­man Na­ture De­odor­ant that con­tains nat­u­ral ex­tracts and oils to pre­vent body odor and is safe for those with sen­si­tive skin. Check out www. hu­man­na­ture.com for more deets. If you’re old- school, Wat­sons has DeoNat Min­eral De­odor­ant Stick— ba­si­cally tawas that’s con­ve­niently shaped like a stick of de­odor­ant.

Q: Only ath­letes get ath­lete’s foot, right?

A: Lolz. Ath­lete’s foot is a fun­gal in­fec­tion, and no­body is safe from fun­gus! Even worse, ath­lete’s foot isn’t just con­fined to your feet; it can mi­grate to your hands, groin, and the rest of your body. It can spread from per­son to per­son through shar­ing of bath tow­els, bed sheets, or cloth­ing. Pub­lic swimming pools, shower room floors, and locker rooms are also common places to pick up ath­lete’s foot.

For­tu­nately, plenty of top­i­cal anti- fun­gal creams are read­ily avail­able at your lo­cal drug­store. If I’m go­ing by brand re­call, I’d say Canesten cream, which con­tains clotri­ma­zole, is the most popular. To stop itch­ing, use it in con­junc­tion with hy­dro­cor­ti­sone. If the in­fec­tion is get­ting pretty gnarly, ew, go see a der­ma­tol­o­gist.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Philippines

© PressReader. All rights reserved.