In­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment and syn­ergy

The Freeman - - OPINION -

It’s, of course, good that our po­lit­i­cal lead­ers are talk­ing about in­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment and growth. Let’s hope the in­ter­est in gen­uine and is sus­tained to its last con­se­quences. We just have to clar­ify what “in­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment” re­ally means, see what ways we can achieve it and what things it re­quires.

In­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment is when such de­vel­op­ment and growth is a prod­uct of the work or due con­tri­bu­tion of all the com­po­nents of a given so­ci­ety. It also means that the fruits of de­vel­op­ment are eq­ui­tably dis­trib­uted and en­joyed by all.

This is the ideal. The re­al­ity is, of course, al­ways a work in progress with all kinds of hur­dles to over­come. But one thing is clear. All ef­forts to pur­sue this ideal sim­ply can­not be based on some eco­nomic, so­cial or po­lit­i­cal ma­neu­ver­ings alone, much less, on some sys­tems and struc­tures only.

The first re­quire­ment is that all ef­forts in this re­gard, be they eco­nomic, so­cial or po­lit­i­cal in char­ac­ter, should be an off­shoot of a gen­uine spirit of a univer­sal and in­clu­sive love and con­cern for the in­te­gral de­vel­op­ment of ev­ery­one.

With­out this spirit clearly mo­ti­vat­ing all these ef­forts, things just can­not pros­per and are doomed to col­lapse sooner or later.

There might be some tem­po­rary ad­van­tages and ben­e­fits, but for sure these can­not last long and may even be a sweet poi­son.

And this spirit is none other than the spirit of Christ who is the pat­tern of our hu­man­ity in all its as­pects, and the redeemer of our dam­aged hu­man con­di­tion here on earth. This spirit of Christ con­tin­ues to in­ter­vene in our life, shap­ing and di­rect­ing it to its proper end. We need to cor­re­spond to this re­al­ity as fully as pos­si­ble.

When we have this spirit of Christ, we will re­al­ize that in­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment is a mat­ter of truly lov­ing ev­ery­one as he or she is, and also as he or she ought to be. It does not treat ev­ery­one in the same way, since not ev­ery­one is the same. The dis­tinc­tions and dif­fer­ences are ac­knowl­edged and are acted upon ac­cord­ingly.

It’s an ever-dy­namic process, guided by some rules that in them­selves also have to be dy­namic, never frozen and static and sim­ply ap­plied blindly or in­dis­crim­i­nately. These laws and rules have to con­tin­u­ally evolve and re­fine them­selves to bet­ter adapt to the con­di­tions on the ground.

Of course, these laws have to be clear about what are of ab­so­lute value that should not changed, and what are of rel­a­tive value that can change and some­times, should change.

With this Chris­tian spirit, in­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment is a mat­ter of cre­at­ing a syn­er­gis­tic mech­a­nism where all the com­po­nents and sec­tors of a given so­ci­ety mu­tu­ally help each other.

This Chris­tian view of in­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment is not blind to the fact that there are peo­ple and sec­tors that can be con­sid­ered as weak, help­less and un­pro­duc­tive like chil­dren, the old peo­ple, those with dis­abil­i­ties of all kinds—phys­i­cal, men­tal, emo­tional and even moral.

The qual­ity of in­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment can some­how be gauged by its ef­forts to look af­ter the weak sec­tors of our so­ci­ety. In other words, more than just eco­nomic, so­cial or po­lit­i­cal mea­sures, it is the kind of char­ity that is in­volved that would de­ter­mine the kind of in­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment we are pur­su­ing.

This Chris­tian view of in­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment cer­tainly re­quires that each one of us truly care for one an­other. Our con­cern for the oth­ers should go all the way to their spir­i­tual and moral needs, not just their eco­nomic needs, etc.

‘This Chris­tian view of in­clu­sive de­vel­op­ment is not blind to the fact that there are peo­ple and sec­tors that can be con­sid­ered as weak, help­less

and un­pro­duc­tive like chil­dren, the old peo­ple, those with dis­abil­i­ties of all kinds— phys­i­cal, men­tal, emo­tional

and even moral.’

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Philippines

© PressReader. All rights reserved.