BRIAN POE LLA­MAN­ZARES

Town & Country (Philippines) - - ON THE COVER - By Han­nah Lazatin

Grow­ing up in Amer­ica, Brian hadn’t a clue about the fame his grand­fa­ther, Fer­nando Poe Jr., held back home. He dis­tinctly re­calls how in the first grade, his mother handed him a news­pa­per clip­ping from the Philip­pines for him to take to show and tell. But his grand­fa­ther’s fame still over­whelmed Brian when he re­turned to the coun­try to at­tend the vet­eran ac­tor’s funeral in 2004. “I was com­pletely shocked when I saw the mul­ti­tudes of peo­ple lin­ing up to say good­bye. I knew him but not well enough. It was nice to get to know him through the sto­ries of oth­ers. The first time I went out on the cam­paign trail in 2013, I met so many peo­ple, each one telling me a dif­fer­ent story of how they met him and what he’d done for them. It started paint­ing this larger-than-life im­age of who my grand­fa­ther re­ally was,” says Brian. He and his two younger sib­lings, Hanna and Anika, were reared un­der the radar, which gave them all a chance at a nor­mal child­hood, free from the con­stant pub­lic­ity their fam­ily would later re­ceive. Look­ing back, he re­mains grate­ful for that op­por­tu­nity be­cause it al­lowed the fam­ily to grow closer to­gether. His par­ents, Neil Lla­man­zares and Se­na­tor Grace Poe Lla­man­zares, used to drop the chil­dren off at school and pick them up. They used to care for the dog and tend to chores to­gether. It was that bond that got them through the tri­als of two elec­tions, he shares. Brian is now in New York work­ing on his mas­ter’s de­gree at Columbia Univer­sity, where he is tak­ing Cli­mate and So­ci­ety. The pro­gram mar­ries two in­ter­ests he’s nur­tured the past few years. He’s seen how cli­mate change and nat­u­ral calami­ties have taken their toll on the coun­try and seeks to study pub­lic poli­cies and en­vi­ron­men­tal sci­ences to cre­ate pre­ven­tive mea­sures in the fu­ture. While study­ing, Brian re­veals he’ll still be in and out of Manila, mon­i­tor­ing the process of a bud­ding busi­ness and a few in­vest­ments. He says that af­ter the elec­tions, he felt un­com­fort­able re­turn­ing to his ca­reer as a jour­nal­ist, so he tried his luck as an en­trepreneur. Among his ven­tures is a re­cently launched time­piece brand called Time Mas­ter, which he con­ceived at the end of the 2016 cam­paign sea­son. Af­ter months of de­sign­ing the watches then trav­el­ing around Asia to source the ma­te­ri­als, he fi­nally un­veiled his “pas­sion project” in May. An ad­vo­cate for ed­u­ca­tion, he adds, “When it was com­plete, I went to my friend Alex Eduque and told her that for ev­ery watch I sold, I would give a por­tion of the sales to MovEd.” The MovEd Foun­da­tion seeks to pro­vide qual­ity, val­ues­formed pri­mary ed­u­ca­tion to chil­dren. He met Alex through Habi­tat for Hu­man­ity, a non-profit or­ga­ni­za­tion he eas­ily could’ve cho­sen to part­ner with but it was the ap­peal of a lo­cal char­ity that started from the ground up that helped him de­cide. “I wanted to see more peo­ple our age mak­ing their dreams a re­al­ity. It’s im­por­tant to me that my suc­cess would help oth­ers.”

AVINO SHIRT, RING JACKET DOU­BLE-BREASTED BLAZER, AND SIMONNOT-GODARD POCKET SQUARE, SIGNET, SHANGRI-LA AT THE FORT; DE GOURNAY SAINT LAU­RENT WALL­PA­PER, EL­E­MENTS FINE FUR­NISH­ING FAB­RICS, DPC PLACE, 2322 CHINO ROCES AV­ENUE, MAKATI, 889.8872

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