VIR­TUAL KEY­BOARD

Qatar Today - - DEVELOPMENT > TECH TALK -

PROJECTS A FULL-SIZED LASER QW­ERTY KEY­BOARD CON­NECTS VIA BLUE­TOOTH TO iDE­VICES, AN­DROID DE­VICES AND MOST LAP­TOPS DE­TEC­TION RATE OF UP TO 400 CHAR­AC­TERS PER MINUTE RECHARGE­ABLE BAT­TERY LASTS FOR UP TO 200 MIN­UTES OF CON­TIN­U­OUS TYP­ING. USB CHARG­ING, NO DRIV­ERS TO IN­STALL MOUSE MODE AL­LOWS YOU TO USE YOUR FIN­GER AS A MOUSE, EF­FEC­TIVELY CON­VERT­ING THE KEY­BOARD INTO A MOTIONPAD BUILT IN DIS­PLAY AL­LOWS YOU TO VIEW THE LAST THREE KEYS TYPED so much on word of mouth, no com­pro­mise was made even on the small­est de­tails, Dige says. “The risk is mas­sive and ev­ery day of last year was spent on less­en­ing that.”

The box reads Smart TV but Dige says it's more than that. “It's ef­fec­tively a mas­sive An­droid tablet. With the re­mote con­trol, air mouse and Qw­erty key­board all rolled into one, its func­tion­al­ity triples. And we have de­vel­oped some­thing even Ap­ple doesn't have cur­rently - a built-in IPTV mod­ule. That tech­nol­ogy was par­tic­u­larly dif­fi­cult to get right back in Tai­wan be­cause of over heat­ing prob­lems,” he says.

And the best news of all is the price. “We are re­tail­ing this 60-inch TV for QR5,500 right now. To buy a Sony or Ap­ple TV of sim­i­lar size and, more im­por­tantly, qual­ity, you'll have to shell out about QR3,000 more.” The same goes for the rest of Royal Dig­i­tal's prod­ucts. “Our Blue­tooth head­set is just as good as, say, Beats' and re­tails for less than half the price,” Dige says, point­ing out that the com­pres­sion rates for the head­sets are iden­ti­cal. Their smart­phone, when it is even­tu­ally launched, will tell a sim­i­lar story. “My wish is that peo­ple will buy our prod­ucts and go, ‘how did they do this?' That they will nudge their friends and say, ‘guess how much I paid for it.'” How­ever, his quest to ef­fec­tively dampen the mys­tique sur­round­ing ‘van­ity brands' is not an easy one, es­pe­cially in this re­gion. “Yes, there are many con­sumers in the re­gion who buy the logo and not nec­es­sar­ily the prod­uct. But we are happy to ac­cept that chal­lenge,” he says. “Con­vinc­ing buy­ers to spend on a brand they have never heard of be­fore is hard. With a strong fo­cus on the on­line au­di­ence and a mar­ket­ing strat­egy which re­flects our brand phi­los­o­phy - neat, in­no­va­tive and con­tem­po­rary - we are work­ing over­time to get our name out there. It's go­ing to take time be­cause peo­ple don't al­ways want to try some­thing new. But once it gets rolling, there'll be a snow­ball ef­fect. In five years, we ex­cept to be the big­gest TV sell­ers in the Mid­dle East.” He pauses for a mo­ment and then adds, “Maybe six.”

Proudly from Qatar, with a global reach

Cur­rently, de­sign and test­ing are be­ing di­vided among the Fox­conn plant in Tai­wan, Qatar, Ger­many and the United King­dom, based on ca­pa­bil­i­ties and lo­gis­tics. “The TV de­sign is sig­nif­i­cantly out­sourced to Fox­conn. It would be stupid not to use the ex­per­tise of the No 1 TV man­u­fac­turer in the world. The test­ing is pri­mar­ily done in our brain cen­tre in Ger­many, which also shares de­sign in­puts and guid­ance. This helps us bring more di­verse ideas to the ta­ble and work to­gether to max­imise our ex­per­tise,” Dige says. Their roll­out strat­egy is also very much global. “Start­ing with Qatar, we are go­ing to ex­pand to Saudi Ara­bia and the UAE. We are also in talks with a cou­ple of re­tail­ers in In­dia, work­ing out the lo­gis­tics and tax is­sues. We want to hit In­dia in Jan­uary next year, Europe later in the year and hope­fully, Amer­ica in time,” he says. He wants to pace him­self and not stretch the company too thin. “Al­ready we find our­selves be­ing un­able to meet the de­mand from on­line sales. It's an ex­cel­lent prob­lem to have though,” he smiles

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Qatar

© PressReader. All rights reserved.