That ’70s colour

Want to stand out at the of­fice, at home, or on the road? Choose brown.

Esquire (Singapore) - - Style -

Steel your­self for a har­row­ing truth: white is now the most pop­u­lar car colour in Amer­ica.

Seem in­nocu­ous? Therein lies the prob­lem. We’re liv­ing in a golden age of mo­tor­ing, a time when cars are faster and more lux­u­ri­ous than ever be­fore. Paint­ing them the same colour as raw tofu just seems... wrong.

The quiet resur­gence of brown, how­ever, feels very right. Con­sider this a throw­back to the ’70s, when fashion houses, in­te­rior de­sign­ers and, yes, au­tomak­ers shifted to earth tones.

Back then, Lin­coln and Cadil­lac slathered their land yachts in as­sorted si­en­nas; at one point, Chrysler’s cat­a­logue of­fered more than 20 shades of bronze, beige and bis­ter. To­day, you’ll find au­tum­nal looks on the run­way from the likes of Bot­tega Veneta, Cer­ruti 1881 and Or­ley. San Diego Padres fans went crazy when their clas­sic brown uni­form was res­ur­rected. Don­ald Glover stole the red carpet at the Golden Globes with his brown tux. New ho­tels, from Ian Schrager’s Pub­lic in down­town New York to the An­daz in Tokyo, have em­braced the warm, invit­ing shade. Just this year, fresh metal from Mercedes-Benz, BMW, In­finiti and Volvo all turned up drip­ping in um­ber. Porsche and Lin­coln also added new browns this year, while Bent­ley’s cur­rent port­fo­lio fea­tures a half-dozen riffs on the colour. The re­sults are eye-open­ing. Why now? It’s anti-tech. De­sign­ers are fo­ment­ing in­sur­rec­tion against the monochro­matic sta­tus quo. Con­sumers want some­thing that’s the op­po­site of the gad­gets that have in­fil­trated their lives. Sonic blues, candy reds, ra­dioac­tive yel­lows—these are blunt, ba­sic tools for break­ing out of the dol­drums. Brown is richer. It’s smart with­out be­ing ob­vi­ous, bold with­out be­ing os­ten­ta­tious.

That said, pulling off brown, whether it’s a tux or a velvet sofa or a chronome­ter, re­quires a cer­tain con­fi­dence. It’s still a rel­a­tive niche (ac­quired tastes al­ways are), but the sub­text is de­li­ciously sub­ver­sive.

1. Zenith watch 2. A Tod’s bracelet 3. A Prada boot 4. A Padres uni­form 5. A Ne­spresso Swiss Army knife. 6. A Pan­tone swatch 7. Fil­son’s U S For­est Ser­vice shirt 8. A vin­tage Porsche 9. NYC ’s Pub­lic hotel 10 & 11. Looks from Bot­tega Veneta and Cer­ruti 18

1. Zenith watch 2. A Tod’s bracelet 3. A Prada boot 4. A Padres uni­form 5. A Ne­spresso Swiss Army knife. 6. A Pan­tone swatch 7. Fil­son’s U S For­est Ser­vice shirt 8. A vin­tage Porsche 9. NYC ’s Pub­lic hotel 10 & 11. Looks from Bot­tega Veneta and Cer­ruti 1881 12. Milo Baugh­man Model #951-103 from RH Modern

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Singapore

© PressReader. All rights reserved.