GOT THE BLUES

A va­ri­ety of tex­tures and sur­fac­ing ma­te­ri­als meet to cre­ate eye- catch­ing de­tails, while ac­cen­tu­at­ing the beauty of this home’s high ceil­ings.

Home & Decor (Singapore) - - CONTENTS -

A va­ri­ety of tex­tures and sur­fac­ing ma­te­ri­als meet to cre­ate eye-catch­ing de­tails, while ac­cen­tu­at­ing the beauty of this home’s high ceil­ings.

WHO A cou­ple in their 30s

HOME Five- room HDB BTO flat in Sengkang

SIZE 1,185sqf

“The idea was to have a nau­ti­cal theme, but one that isn’t so lit­eral,” says in­te­rior de­signer Si Jian Xin.

The use of sea and sky shades, as well as a play on ge­om­e­try, give this home a nau­ti­cal-in­spired look with a stylish mod­ern twist.

Colour dra­mat­i­cally en­hances a space, and in the home of Si Jian Wen and Sharon Teo, the calm­ing cool shades of blues and greens de­fine the in­te­ri­ors. As Sharon’s favourite colour is mint, it was a start­ing point for the flat’s colour pal­ette, the cou­ple say. But apart from up­lift­ing colours, de­signer Si Jian Xin also in­cor­po­rated ge­o­met­ri­cal ac­cents, in the form of fur­nish­ings and ma­te­ri­als, to en­hance the home’s clean, con­tem­po­rary look.

“The idea was to have a nau­ti­cal theme, but one that isn’t so lit­eral,” he says, on the ab­stract way he trans­lated and in­fused the el­e­ments of the theme into the spa­ces. Apart from the

colours that bring to mind the sky and sea, round wire-mesh glass win­dows — a mod­ern in­ter­pre­ta­tion of port­hole win­dows — can be found on the bath­room doors, while the front gate fea­tures a graph­i­cal fish scale-in­spired de­sign. Tak­ing the use of geo­met­ric shapes fur­ther, there are also curved ob­long mir­rors, lin­ear fur­ni­ture and struc­tures, and tes­sel­lated ma­te­rial sur­faces such as hexag­o­nal mo­saic tiles laid in a chevron pat­tern.

A cre­ative way of dis­guis­ing the bomb shel­ter’s ven­ti­la­tion frag­men­ta­tion plate was to turn what is usu­ally re­garded as an eye­sore into an “art piece”. Jian Xin had it painted a metal­lic bronze tone and, cou­pled with a black wall-mounted lamp with a min­i­mal­ist lin­ear de­sign in­stalled be­low it, the wall that back­drops the din­ing area is likened to an ab­stract geo­met­ric in­stal­la­tion.

Cus­tomised loose fur­ni­ture pieces also add to the home’s in­te­ri­ors. Jian Xin de­signed a long side­board, for the open liv­ing area, us­ing pan­els of peg­board for the doors.

“Not only does it make the piece look in­ter­est­ing and unique, it al­lows for ven­ti­la­tion,” he ex­plains.

Po­si­tioned near the en­trance, it gives the space char­ac­ter and also serves as stor­age for shoes. More stor­age space is in­te­grated in the bay win­dow seats that “out­line” the liv­ing room, help­ing to zone the open lay­out.

For the $75,000 ren­o­va­tion, mostly hum­ble ma­te­ri­als of paint, laminates and tiles were used, but ap­plied imag­i­na­tively and taste­fully, they bring out a sim­ple beauty.

WHERE TO GO

Wynk Col­lab­o­ra­tive, www.wynkcol­lab­o­ra­tive.com

The home has an open lay­out, with the op­tion to close up var­i­ous spa­ces — the mas­ter bed­room, study and kitchen — us­ing flush doors and slide-and-fold doors. ABOVE

The colours in the apart­ment re­flect home­own­ers Si Jian Wen and Sharon Teo’s vi­brant per­son­al­i­ties. B E LO W , L E F T

In the liv­ing area, dis­creet stor­age space is in­te­grated with built-in benches in front of the win­dows. B E LO W , R I G H T

THIS PAGE & OP­PO­SITE As there was no need for three bed­rooms, the home­own­ers de­cided to com­bine two for a big­ger mas­ter bed­room. Dusty shades give the room a calm­ing feel, and the sleep­ing area is sep­a­rated from the dress­ing and groom­ing area by a low built-in con­sole.

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