WHY THE LONG, UGLY FACE?

MEN WITH HIGHER LEV­ELS OF STRESS HOR­MONES ARE RATED AS LESS AT­TRAC­TIVE, AC­CORD­ING TO A STUDY BY SCOT­TISH SCI­EN­TISTS. TO CON­VINCE HER YOU’RE THE CATCH OF THE DAY, OR­DER THE SEAFOOD. RU­MOURED APHRO­DISIAC PROP­ER­TIES ASIDE, OMEGA-3 (OF WHICH FISH IS A TOP SOU

Men's Health (Singapore) - - EXTRAS! -

PRETTY STRESSRELIEVING, ISN’T IT?

A Not­ting­ham Univer­sity study found that look­ing at some­one you’re at­tracted to is an ef­fec­tive method of re­duc­ing com­mut­ing stress. But keep it dis­creet. Sneak­ing glances at the beauty on the seat op­po­site might soothe your psy­cho­log­i­cal pins, but you run the risk of phys­i­cal ones if she spots you.

SMILE FOR MILES

The eas­i­est way to beat stress-re­lated headaches? Smile, even if it hurts. Forc­ing a grin re­leases mood-im­prov­ing hor­mones, the Univer­sity of Kansas found, eas­ing fa­cial ten­sion. While shout­ing and cussing are proven de-stres­sors, they work best for sud­den bursts of pain. Save it for your ice bath.

BLOW OFF SOME “STEAM”

Spend 10 min­utes brows­ing movies on­line with erotic con­tent and your stress lev­els will halve, a Carnegie Mel­lon Univer­sity study found. The trick was even shown to boost per­for­mance in maths tasks by 50 per­cent. We don’t ad­vise it when up­dat­ing the of­fice Ex­cel, though.

MIND FUN

Sus­sex Univer­sity found that your stress lev­els de­creased by 68 per­cent after you read some­thing you en­joy for just six min­utes.

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