HOW TOP DOCS AVOID CAN­CER

WE ASKED PHYSI­CIANS AND RE­SEARCHERS: HOW DO YOU DODGE CAN­CER? ONE AN­SWER IS OB­VI­OUS: DON’T SMOKE. HERE ARE 10 MORE WAYS THESE EX­PERTS PRO­TECT THEM­SELVES.

Men's Health (Singapore) - - FRONT PAGE -

MIST YOUR MUG

YOUR SKIN WINS YOUR BODY’S PRIZE FOR “MOST LIKELY TO GET CAN­CER.” EV­ERY MORN­ING, DER­MA­TOL­O­GIST DR JOSEPH SOBANKO, OF THE UNI­VER­SITY OF PENN­SYL­VA­NIA, USES GENERIC BROAD-SPEC­TRUM SPF 30 SUN­SCREEN WITH EI­THER ZINC OR TI­TA­NIUM DIOX­IDE. HE SHUTS HIS EYES AND SPRAYS AN EVEN COAT ON HIS FACE AF­TER HE BRUSHES HIS TEETH AND COMBS HIS HAIR. 2 POP LOW-DOSE AS­PIRIN

This does more than soothe aches and sti­fle heart at­tacks; it curbs colon in­flam­ma­tion. Daniel Rosen­berg, direc­tor of the Colon Can­cer Pre­ven­tion Pro­gram at the Uni­ver­sity of Con­necti­cut Health, tells ev­ery­one he knows to take 81mg a day. Ask your doc­tor first, be­cause some peo­ple run the risk of ex­ces­sive bleed­ing. “If your doc­tor ap­proves, you should do it,” he says. In a study re­view in An­nals of In­ter­nal Medicine, peo­ple who took 75mg to 1,200mg of as­pirin daily for at least a year re­duced their risk of dy­ing of col­orec­tal can­cer by 33 per­cent over 20 years.

4 TAKE A SKIN SUP­PLE­MENT

Dr An­thony Rossi, a der­ma­tol­o­gist at Memo­rial Sloan Ket­ter­ing Can­cer Cen­ter, takes nicoti­namide each morn­ing with wa­ter and food. Nicoti­namide is a form of vi­ta­min B3 that may re­duce the for­ma­tion of cer­tain skin can­cers, pos­si­bly by blunt­ing the cell dam­age in­duced by UV rays. (But tak­ing it doesn’t ex­empt you from us­ing sun­screen.) Al­ways check with your doc­tor be­fore start­ing a new sup­ple­ment, of course. 5 PITCH PLAS­TIC JUNE CHAN, A PRO­FES­SOR OF UROL­OGY AT THE UNI­VER­SITY OF CAL­I­FOR­NIA AT SAN FRANCISCO, PACKS HER LUNCH – BUT NOT IN PLAS­TIC, WHICH MAY CON­TAIN CAN­CER-PRO­MOT­ING CHEM­I­CALS. SHE PACKS SALAD (KALE, FETA, PUMP­KIN SEEDS, RAISINS) IN A MASON JAR.

SWEAT FOR 75 TO 150 MIN­UTES

Dr Keith McCrae, an on­col­o­gist with the Cleve­land Clinic Can­cer In­sti­tute, works long hours but fits in ex­er­cise six days a week. He loves road bik­ing – 40km to 50km most week­days, more on week­ends. A study in JAMA In­ter­nal

Medicine found that peo­ple who did 1¼ hours of vig­or­ous or 2½ hours of mod­er­ate ac­tiv­ity a week had a 31 per­cent lower risk of dy­ing of can­cer than those who didn’t work out. Ex­er­cise helps tame in­flam­ma­tion, pos­si­bly re­duc­ing can­cer risk.

7 CALM THE HECK DOWN!

C Chronic stress can feed can­cer. Here’s youryo 15-minute pre­scrip­tion from urol­o­gist Dr Nel­son Ben­nett of North­west­ern Uni­ver­sity Fein­bergFe School of Medicine: Sit with the door closed,clo phone si­lenced. In­hale deeply through youryo nose and ex­hale from your mouth 10 times.tim Close your eyes and no­tice the sounds aroundaro you – even the hum of flu­o­res­cent lights.lig Then bring your thoughts to your breaths.bre Don’t worry if your mind wan­ders. It tookt Dr Ben­nett about 15 ses­sions to get com­fort­able.co “The more I prac­tised it, the eas­ierea it got,” he says. You’ll get pos­i­tive re­in­force­ment:rei less stress with dead­lines and bet­terbe fo­cus on de­mand. BOLT DOWN SOME NUTS When Dr Matthew Yurgelun, a med­i­cal on­col­o­gist at DanaFar­ber Can­cer In­sti­tute, needs a snack, he eats al­monds or pis­ta­chios. “It’s a great way to quell hunger and keep me from snack­ing on fatty or sug­ary foods that can con­trib­ute to weight gain and obe­sity-re­lated dis­eases, such as can­cer,” he says. A Na­tional In­sti­tutes of Health study even showed that smok­ers who snacked on nuts re­duced their risk of lung can­cer, pos­si­bly be­cause nuts curb ox­ida­tive stress as­so­ci­ated with smok­ing. Eat 20 to 24 nuts a day.

OR­DER THE FISH

UCLA urol­o­gist Dr Christo­pher Sai­gal eats fish but not meat. A typ­i­cal din­ner is a salmon fil­let with brown rice and veg­eta­bles. Try it twice a week. “I tell pa­tients that ‘heart healthy’ foods have been as­so­ci­ated with a lower risk of de­vel­op­ing prostate can­cer and a lower risk of pro­gres­sion of prostate can­cer af­ter di­ag­no­sis.” Plus, a UK study re­view linked red and pro­cessed meats with col­orec­tal can­cer. 10 START THE DAY GREEN GREEN TEA IS PACKED WITH AN­TIOX­I­DANTS. ALAN WAN, A MED­I­CAL ON­COL­O­GIST AT NORTH­WEST­ERN MEDICINE KISHWAUKEE HOS­PI­TAL, HAS A CUP EACH MORN­ING. IN A 2016 STUDY, MAO FENG GREEN TEA HAD ONE OF THE HIGH­EST AN­TIOX­I­DANT LEV­ELS PER BREW.

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