I STOOD UP QUICKLY AND THE ROOM STARTED SPIN­NING. I WAS SO DIZZY THAT I HIT THE FLOOR. WHAT HAP­PENED? – Phil

Men's Health (Singapore) - - ASK MEN'S HEALTH -

CChances are you ex­pe­ri­enced some­thing called benign parox­ys­mal po­si­tional ver­tigo.

The key word here? “Benign.” That’s good. This is the con­di­tion that made golfer Ja­son Day hit the fair­way (with his head, not his ball) dur­ing the US Open last year – but he re­cov­ered and be­came No. 1 in the world.

It’s dif­fer­ent than gar­den-va­ri­ety dizzi­ness, which gen­er­ally passes in sec­onds af­ter you stand quickly. It’s also dif­fer­ent than or­tho­static hy­poten­sion, a blood pres­sure prob­lem that wors­ens the longer you stand.

Benign parox­ys­mal po­si­tional ver­tigo is sud­den, and it’s

brought on by dis­lodged cal­cium car­bon­ate crys­tals in your in­ner ear, says Dr Carol Fos­ter, direc­tor of the Bal­ance Lab­o­ra­tory at the Uni­ver­sity of Colorado Hos­pi­tal.

These crys­tals re­lay mo­tion sig­nals to your brain, but if they mi­grate to the wrong place, you get se­ri­ously dizzy.

It can take months for the con­di­tion to clear up, but you can co­erce the crys­tals back into place with a se­ries of wacky poses that mimic yoga. Ask a doc­tor to show you how.

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