Stay Woke For Brighter Men­tal Health

BREAK­ING YOUR FAST AF­TER EARLY MORN­ING TRAIN­ING MAY BE THE SMARTEST WAY TO SHIFT POUNDS. LOAD UP ON EMPTY PROM­ISES.

Men's Health (Singapore) - - ON THE COVER -

Off­set the ef­fects of sea­sonal de­pres­sion by giv­ing your pil­low the night off.

The big break­fast de­bate has been set­tled. Un­til now, the op­pos­ing cases have been pre­sented as fol­lows: Skip break­fast and train fasted to spike your me­tab­o­lism and in­crease your to­tal fat burn by 8 per­cent. Al­ter­na­tively, wait to di­gest your morn­ing eggs in or­der to train harder for faster gains.

Both are en­tic­ing – which is con­fus­ing. But the lat­est re­search from the Univer­sity of Scran­ton con­firms that fasted ex­er­cise is the tasti­est prospect for weight loss. And not for the rea­sons pre­vi­ously thought.

Sci­en­tists set out to dis­cover how tim­ing break­fast around a morn­ing work­out could af­fect ap­petite for the rest of the day. Two groups were fed ex­actly the same break­fast at dif­fer­ent times, be­fore be­ing given the green light to in­dulge as they saw fit for lunch and din­ner.

Subjects who ate their first meal af­ter swing­ing a ket­tle­bell, rather than be­fore, con­sumed 900 fewer calo­ries through­out the day. This sup­ports pre­vi­ous re­search link­ing ex­er­cise to a de­crease in the brain’s neu­ral re­sponse to food im­agery.

For any­one look­ing to lose a few ki­los, the prospect of a 900-calo­rie deficit with zero hunger pangs is most wel­come. As is the free pass pro­vided by a hun­gry morn­ing work­out to re­ally make a meal out of your break­fast.

Grab-and-go toast no longer cuts it. Sal­mon and eggs, on the other hand? Em­phat­i­cally, yes.

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