DON’T RUN YOUR­SELF INTO THE GROUND

Do­ing the wrong thing after pound­ing the pave­ment can be worse than you think. Su­san Paul, ex­er­cise phys­i­ol­o­gist and pro­gram direc­tor for the Or­lando Track Shack Foun­da­tion, re­veals what you should and shouldn’t do after a run.

Men's Health (Singapore) - - REV YOU RUN -

while run­ning can be­come rou­tine after a cer­tain amount of time, there def­i­nitely are ways you can sab­o­tage your work­out ef­forts if you do cer­tain things in­cor­rectly right after your run. From my ex­pe­ri­ence of work­ing with run­ners and ath­letes over the years, here are my top five worst things to do post-run.

1 YOU STAY IN YOUR RUN­NING CLOTHES

Get out of damp gear im­me­di­ately. Even if you didn’t sweat that much, worn or soggy cloth­ing is an en­vi­ron­ment bac­te­ria love to cling to, and it can also give you a deep chill that is hard to re­cover from—even on a warm sum­mer day.

Re­gard­less of whether you can shower right away or not, change your clothes, socks, and shoes im­me­di­ately to keep your mus­cles warm and loose. This pro­motes good cir­cu­la­tion, which aids the re­cov­ery process after a run. And keep­ing the blood flow­ing is es­sen­tial for de­liv­ery of fresh oxy­gen and nu­tri­ents while it also whisks away meta­bolic waste prod­ucts.

It al­ways feels good to get out of run­ning shoes after a tough run, but be sure to put on a sup­port­ive pair of shoes or san­dals if your legs or feet are feel­ing es­pe­cially spent. The mus­cles in your feet also get tired, so your post-run shoes need to have good sup­port.

2 YOU BE­COME A COUCH POTATO

It’s easy to feel like you’ve earned a day on the sofa binge­watch­ing Net­flix when a good train­ing run is com­pleted. Don’t suc­cumb to this. Light ac­tiv­ity is a great re­cov­ery tool be­cause it keeps blood mov­ing in your body, aid­ing your re­cov­ery by re­pair­ing and refuelling your body.

Plan some light ac­tiv­ity through­out the day, even if you are headed to work. Get up, walk around, do some gen­tle stretches while stand­ing, and breathe deeply. If you are go­ing to be sit­ting or stand­ing a good part of the day after a run, con­sider wear­ing some com­pres­sion socks to help keep blood from pool­ing in your lower legs.

LIGHT AC­TIV­ITY IS A GREAT RE­COV­ERY TOOL AS IT KEEPS BLOOD MOV­ING IN YOUR BODY, AID­ING YOUR RE­COV­ERY BY RE­PAIR­ING AND REFUELLING YOUR BODY.

STOOPING, CLIMB­ING LAD­DERS, OR PICK­ING UP HEAVY EQUIP­MENT WHEN YOUR MUS­CLES ARE AL­READY TIRED CAN BE A RECIPE FOR IN­JURY AFTER A RUN.

3 YOU DON’T RE­FUEL RIGHT

Plan to drink and eat after your runs, prefer­ably within 20 to 30 min­utes of fin­ish­ing. If you are headed right to work, or have other com­mit­ments im­me­di­ately after a run, pack a cooler with some healthy snacks be­fore­hand so you can grab and go—pos­si­bly even eat­ing in the car.

Be sure your snacks in­clude pro­tein, a lit­tle fat, and some com­plex car­bo­hy­drates for re­plen­ish­ing en­ergy needs. Good op­tions in­clude choco­late milk, a tur­key sand­wich on whole wheat bread, al­monds, fruit, or yo­gurt. Keep plenty of wa­ter on hand, too, so you can re­hy­drate through­out the day. And as easy as it is to do, avoid the other ex­treme of pig­ging out after a long run. Don’t ra­tio­nal­ize that you can eat any­thing you want be­cause you ran long to­day. Re­plac­ing calo­ries burned on a run is all too easy, so don’t undo all your hard work by out-eat­ing your run­ning.

4 YOU DO HEAVY CHORES

It sounds good at first: while sweaty, why not do the yard work when you get home be­fore get­ting cleaned up? You could mow the lawn, pull weeds, or do other heavy chores. But this can be very tough on tired mus­cles, es­pe­cially when you are par­tially de­hy­drated and/or un­der­nour­ished from your run.

Do­ing things like bend­ing over, stooping, climb­ing lad­ders, or pick­ing up heavy equip­ment when your mus­cles are al­ready tired can be a recipe for in­jury. If at all pos­si­ble, put these chores off just one day or give your­self sev­eral solid hours of re­cov­ery time. While all this sounds like the per­fect ex­cuse to get out of get­ting those leaves out of the gut­ter, it’s much bet­ter to do these tasks when you are at full strength.

5 YOU SHORT-CHANGE EASY DAY RE­COV­ERY

Don’t min­i­mize your ac­com­plish­ments, what­ever your pace or dis­tance. Think­ing that you don’t need re­cov­ery be­cause your run or race was “too slow” or “too short” is mis­guided think­ing.

Pace and dis­tance are rel­a­tive to each run­ner, so it al­ways counts and al­ways plays a fac­tor in how you might feel on the next run. Treat your body with re­spect—re­gard­less of the pace and dis­tance. You will reap the re­wards of your train­ing and your body will thank you if you take care of it and re­cover prop­erly.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Singapore

© PressReader. All rights reserved.