THE PRES­SURE IS ON

New re­search re­veals that “white-coat hy­per­ten­sion”—the stress of be­ing in a med­i­cal en­vi­ron­ment—is not be­nign. It can be in­dica­tive of how your BP in­creases in re­sponse to stress­ful sit­u­a­tions. If you’re among the es­ti­mated 30 per­cent of peo­ple whose BP

Men's Health (Singapore) - - EXTRAS! -

FOR­GET ABOUT BE­ING HAPPY TO BE HAPPY

New re­search from Rut­gers and the Univer­sity of Toronto Scar­bor­ough says the pur­suit of hap­pi­ness can ac­tu­ally make you un­happy. Four ex­per­i­ments found a cor­re­la­tion be­tween the goal of pur­su­ing hap­pi­ness and feel­ing time-crunched, which can un­der­mine well-be­ing. The key to this dilemma, re­searchers sug­gest, is shift­ing fo­cus from chas­ing what you think will make you happy to ap­pre­ci­at­ing what is al­ready giv­ing you joy. Try keep­ing a grat­i­tude jour­nal and see if your mood doesn’t lift.

DON’T JUST DRINK YOUR TROU­BLES AWAY

Im­bib­ing can dam­age the mu­cosal lin­ing of your GI tract and dis­rupt the di­ges­tion of nu­tri­ents. Al­co­hol also in­ter­feres with stom­ach-acid pro­duc­tion, in­creas­ing the amount of harm­ful bac­te­ria that sur­vives the jour­ney to your gut. Drink in mod­er­a­tion and on a full stom­ach, if at all. Glu­tamine sup­ple­ments may also help pro­tect the mu­cosal lin­ing.

A RACE AGAINST TIME

Self-flag­el­la­tion is un­nec­es­sary. Just spend­ing 50 min­utes of mod­er­ate train­ing, three days a week, will steel your body against the march of time, the Amer­i­can Jour­nal of Pre­ven­tive medicine re­ports. Of course, hit­ting it a lit­tle harder never hurts. A Brigham Young Univer­sity study found that men who go for a 40 minute run, 5 times a week, slow their bi­o­log­i­cal stop­watch by as many as nine years

HACK YOUR ME­TAB­O­LISM

Ev­i­dence sug­gests that keep­ing calo­rie con­sump­tion con­fined to an ear­lier win­dow means less weight gain than eat­ing more later in the day. One new study tested the 16:8 diet—16 hours of fast­ing and 8 of eat­ing. Af­ter 12 weeks, vol­un­teers ate about 300 fewer calo­ries a day than a con­trol group and lost about 3 per­cent of their body weight—enough to cause a dis­cernible drop in vis­ceral fat com­pared with the con­trol. Re­searchers say that’s crit­i­cal for im­prov­ing meta­bolic health in a sus­tain­able way.

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