SCALP WORK

Rules For The Modern Man - - Rules For The Modern Man -

The clichéd phrase about your hair be­ing your crown­ing glory is nev­er­the­less true. How you wear your hair af­fects the way you are per­ceived by oth­ers, and how you care for it is equally im­por­tant. Hereʼs what you need to pay at­ten­tion to, when it comes to hair care.

IT’S GROW­ING

The hair ex­perts at Phyto ex­plain that your hair fol­li­cles grow around 20 hairs in a life­time, and not all of them are ac­tively grow­ing hair at any one time. As you age, the num­ber of ac­tive fol­li­cles de­creases. This is the cause of alope­cia, or bald­ness.

Once a hair fol­li­cle stops pro­duc­ing hair, itʼs per­ma­nent and noth­ing can re­vive it short of a trans­plant. As a re­sult, hair care prod­ucts tend to em­pha­sise on pre­vent­ing hair loss in the first place. Fac­tors that add to hair loss in­clude se­bum that clogs up the fol­li­cle, male hor­mones, ge­net­ics, skin con­di­tions and even nutri­tion. Some of these is­sues can be fixed.

WATCH YOUR DIET

Sodium, greasy and very acidic or al­ka­line foods can af­fect the scalp ad­versely and cause hair to fall. Try to in­clude more nuts in your diet as they con­tain oils that make hair more elas­tic. Iron-, mag­ne­sium- and vi­ta­min B-rich foods can help in­crease hair growth. Vi­ta­min D is an­other im­por­tant con­trib­u­tor to hair growth. Load up on eggs if you can.

Stress is an­other ma­jor cause of hair loss and one that can be at­trib­uted to ur­ban life­styles. This can be eas­ily reme­died. Just stop wor­ry­ing and cut your losses.

Go Ba­nanas

A pop­u­lar celebrity recipe for hair care is ba­nana. The fruit offers iron, mag­ne­sium, zinc and potas­sium as well as vi­ta­mins A,B, C and E. One sug­ges­tion is to take a ba­nana with a glass of wa­ter first thing in the morn­ing. If noth­ing else, it’s a healthy start to the day.

KNOW WHAT YOU USE

There is no one per­fect hair care prod­uct you can use to en­sure your hair stays with you till youʼre 80. How­ever, hair care prod­ucts with mint in them gen­er­ally help with hair and scalp is­sues. Mint acts as a stim­u­lant, in­creas­ing blood flow to the scalp and it can help with dry scalp and dan­druff is­sues. Its an­ti­sep­tic prop­er­ties can also al­le­vi­ate itch­i­ness in the skin, and has a sooth­ing ef­fect in gen­eral. Most hair prod­ucts use sul­phates in their sham­poos, as it is a good cleans­ing agent, but can also cause ir­ri­ta­tion in sen­si­tive skin. Al­ways rinse your sham­poo off thor­oughly and con­di­ton at the ends of hair rather than the root. The former stim­u­lates blood flow to the scalp, and the lat­ter nour­ishes the hair from the tip down, without ag­gra­vat­ing the scalp or loos­en­ing the hair roots.

FA­CIAL DIMORPHISM

This is the sci­ence of phys­i­cal at­trac­tive­ness in menʼs fa­cial fea­tures. While we may be­moan the fact that there is a de­part­ment in the world that bus­ies it­self with defin­ing beauty, its stud­ies in­di­cate a broader fore­head, longer jaw­line, prom­i­nent chin and brow and de­fined cheek­bones are what stands as at­trac­tive to the gen­eral pub­lic. While we can­not change the shape and struc­ture of our faces without plas­tic surgery, we can style our hair to fall into fa­cial dimorphism. Avoid long side­burns at all cost, un­less you ʼre the in­car­na­tion of Elvis.

OBLON GFACED Keep your hair trimmed at the sides, and longer at the top, combed back loosely.

SQUARE JAWED The Ar­mani cut, a mod­i­fied crew cut with a longer fringe line and nearly shaved off at the sides, is an ideal style.

OVAL FACED Let your hair grow out and comb it loosely to the side, so it adds some breadth to your face and bal­ances out a sharp chin.

ROUND FACED Leave the fringe line longer to cover the fore­head slightly. Keep the sides neat with a quiff on top to vis­ually lengthen your face.

TRIANGULAR FACES If you have a high scalp, grow out your hair to bal­ance out the jaw­line as much as pos­si­ble.

AN­GU­LAR CHINS Keep a high quiff or comb a longer fringe across the fore­head to em­pha­sise fea­tures.

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