FOUR WAYS TO FIGHT IN­FLAM­MA­TION

Shape (Singapore) - - Live Healthy -

At the very least, a chron­i­cally fired up im­mune sys­tem saps energy and tanks your mood. At worst, it ups your risk for is­sues like heart dis­ease and can­cer. These smart strate­gies will help. In­flam­ma­tion is good for you in small doses. If you get a cut, for ex­am­ple, swelling slows blood loss and calls bac­te­ria-fight­ing white blood cells to the in­jury site. Prob­lems oc­cur when stress, junk food, lack of ex­er­cise, or a lin­ger­ing ill­ness trig­ger con­stant lowlevel in­flam­ma­tion.

This makes blood stick­ier and thick­ens the artery walls, in­creas­ing your like­li­hood of car­dio­vas­cu­lar dis­ease, heart at­tacks, and stroke, as well as type-2 di­a­betes and can­cer. The good news is that these sim­ple habits can min­imise in­flam­ma­tion and the re­sult­ing harm.

Re­in­force your gut

In­gest­ing pro­bi­otics (good bac­te­ria that fight in­fec­tion) re­sults in fewer signs of in­flam­ma­tion in the heart, found a re­cent study pre­sented in Nutri­tion Re­view. Your goal: Ev­ery day, eat at least one serv­ing of pro­bi­otic-rich op­tions such as yogurt, pick­les or kim­chi, or kom­bucha tea.

Eat more greens

A mostly plant-based, whole-food diet will min­imise in­flam­ma­tion. Plus, it doesn’t hurt to bump up your pro­tec­tion with an­ti­in­flam­ma­tory su­per­stars like vi­ta­min E (up to 1,200 IU daily) and quercetin (1,500 to 1,800 mg daily), a flavonol found in many fruits and veg­eta­bles.

Be so­cia­ble

Hang­ing out and laugh­ing with close friends and fam­ily is a proven an­ti­in­flam­ma­tory, ac­cord­ing to re­searchers from the Univer­sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the US. Try to have at least one mean­ing­ful so­cial in­ter­ac­tion (as in, take the time to have a con­ver­sa­tion with a friend or plan a lunch date) ev­ery sin­gle day.

Flex­er­cise

The gen­tle move­ments of yoga, stretch­ing, and walk­ing ease in­flam­ma­tion by re­duc­ing stress. Just 10 to 15 min­utes daily will make a real im­pact.

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