HOW FRIC­TION DAM­AGE STARTS

Shape (Singapore) - - Look Great -

Each strand’s outer layer, or cu­ti­cle, is made up of scales on the sur­face of the hair and a lipid pro­tec­tion bar­rier (a fatty layer of mol­e­cules) that keeps the scales soft and flat, Martina says.

When fric­tion dam­ages that nat­u­ral shield, it causes the scales to flex up­wards and can even pull them off, leav­ing holes in the cu­ti­cle. This ex­poses the cor­tex – the in­ner struc­ture of the hair – which is com­prised of bun­dles of a tough protein called ker­atin (they look like ca­bles with hun­dreds of wires wound around them). “When these bun­dles fray, you get split ends,” Martina says. And when you tug – to comb or pony up – the weak­ened hair breaks.

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