SUGAR CRUSH

CON­SUM­ING TOO MUCH ADDED SUGAR ONLY SETS THE STAGE FOR A BEVY OF HEALTH PROB­LEMS LIKE DI­A­BETES. IT’S TIME YOU BREAK THAT AD­DIC­TION AND CURB YOUR SWEET TOOTH.

Shape (Singapore) - - Contents -

Curb your sweet tooth for good with th­ese healthy eat­ing tips.

Choose cream or white-hued crock­ery

One study pub­lished in the Jour­nal of Sen­sory

Stud­ies found that par­tic­i­pants thought hot cho­co­late tasted sweeter in a cream-coloured cup. The ar­ti­cle also shared that peo­ple thought straw­berry mousse ap­peared to be sweeter on a white plate than a black one.

Eat a pro­tein-rich break­fast

A pro­tein-rich break­fast pro­motes sati­ety and re­duces brain ac­tiv­ity that com­pels crav­ings, so you won’t feel as com­pelled to eat high-fat or high-sugar foods later in the day, says one US study.

Pick a de­caf drink

The bit­ter­ness of tea and cof­fee makes one more likely to reach for sugar or a sweet treat, and a re­cent study by Cor­nell Univer­sity in the US also found that caffeine tends to ham­per your abil­ity to de­tect sweet­ness, mak­ing you want to load up on sugar.

Add cin­na­mon and vanilla

If you can’t ditch your morn­ing cuppa, try adding cin­na­mon or vanilla. Just as how adding spices and herbs to dishes help you cut down on adding salt, the two fra­grant in­gre­di­ents are of­ten as­so­ci­ated with sweet­ness, trick­ing your body into think­ing a food or drink is sweeter than it re­ally is.

Be aware of your stress lev­els

Sweet­ened bev­er­ages re­port­edly help sup­press stress lev­els, which is why we crave them when dead­lines are loom­ing. Some­thing to think about be­fore down­ing that next cup of sweet­ened tea or soda.

Eat dark cho­co­late

If you love cho­co­late, have some of it, but go for the dark va­ri­ety. Be­sides the rich choco­latey flavour, healthy fats and an­tiox­i­dants it de­liv­ers, dark cho­co­late sup­pos­edly makes you feel more sat­is­fied, so you’re less likely to go for sweet, salty and fatty foods af­ter­wards.

Avoid pro­cessed foods

Even if they don’t taste sweet, there’s a lot of sugar hid­den in th­ese snacks, which add to their ad­dic­tive qual­ity. Eat­ing them of­ten de­sen­si­tises you to the taste and effects of both salt and sugar, so don’t make it a reg­u­lar habit.

Go to sleep

As you stay up into the later hours of the night, your self-con­trol for salty and sweet foods goes down, shares a re­port pub­lished in Obe­sity. Th­ese un­nec­es­sary calo­ries then get stored as fat and con­trib­ute to weight gain. If you have trou­ble sleep­ing, switch to warmer lights and put away your gadgets. Also, skip the mid­night snack as it might lead to in­di­ges­tion and poor qual­ity of sleep.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Singapore

© PressReader. All rights reserved.