HE TAKES PA­TIENTS TO HOS­PI­TAL

Simply Her (Singapore) - - Beauty | News -

AB­DUL RAZAK, 50, PA­TIENT TRANS­PORTER

For the past 13 years, the fa­ther of three has given many can­cer pa­tients a shoul­der to cry on. His face is the first one they see when they head to the hos­pi­tal for chemo­ther­apy or ra­di­a­tion treat­ment. He’s also the last per­son they en­counter from the hos­pi­tal when they’re go­ing home, be­cause Razak drives a van for the Sin­ga­pore Can­cer So­ci­ety, fer­ry­ing sick pa­tients be­tween their homes and the hos­pi­tal. “When I first started this job, I was shocked to see how phys­i­cally weak the pa­tients were and how de­pressed they were. I shed many tears for them, and I de­cided to make the best use of my short time with them in the van. I greet them with a smile and crack jokes to win them over. I want them to feel com­fort­able. I be­lieve that if they stay happy, their health may im­prove.

I in­ter­act with all sorts of can­cer pa­tients but my ex­pe­ri­ence with one woman, who had ad­vanced breast can­cer in her early 30s and died from it, de­spite in­ten­sive treat­ment, stays with me. Day by day, I could see the phys­i­cal changes af­flict­ing her – she be­came pale and hag­gard, and her face had red spots from the treat­ment. When her hus­band called to tell me that she had passed on, I was re­ally, re­ally sad.

This job has its share of good and bad mo­ments. But the good things I get to do far out­weigh the fleet­ing sad­ness I may feel. I’m over­joyed when can­cer sur­vivors still re­mem­ber me and call out when they see me. I feel proud that I have made an im­pact on their lives, no mat­ter how small.”

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Singapore

© PressReader. All rights reserved.