Words your boss wants to hear

The right words can do won­ders, to get you no­ticed. Ca­reer ex­perts sug­gest th­ese top magic phrases. BY SASHA GON­ZA­LES

Simply Her (Singapore) - - Cover Reads -

1 “YES, I CAN DO IT”

Your boss wants to see that you’re up for a chal­lenge, you can do what needs to be done and that you’re pos­i­tive about see­ing it through. But, only say this if you re­ally think you can, says Yas­mine Khater, founder of Tran­spi­ral.org, a mo­ti­va­tional com­pany for women. Don’t over-com­mit – oth­er­wise, you won’t be able to de­liver.

2“I KNOW HOW TO SOLVE THIS”

When your team runs into a prob­lem, don’t com­plain about it; be proac­tive and bring so­lu­tions to the ta­ble, ad­vises El­fa­rina Zaid, ex­ec­u­tive and lead­er­ship coach at Elf Coach­ing. If it’s a peren­nial prob­lem, sug­gest an ac­tion plan. This shows that you know how to look at the big pic­ture and un­der­stand that it’s im­por­tant to con­tin­u­ally im­prove.

3

“HOW CAN I HELP?”

Vol­un­teer­ing your time and skills for new roles and projects will help you ex­er­cise your lead­er­ship abil­i­ties. But don’t just of­fer your ser­vices, says El­fa­rina. Share how you can help and ex­plain why you’re per­fect for the task. This also shows your boss that you are will­ing to go out of your way to get in­volved. “This puts you well ahead of your peers who are only con­cerned about what they’ve been paid to do,” says El­fa­rina.

4“IT’S MY FAULT. I’M SORRY”

Ad­mit­ting to a mis­take is never easy. Yas­mine says your boss wants to see that you can take re­spon­si­bil­ity in­stead of mak­ing ex­cuses or blam­ing some­body else. How­ever, own­ing up isn’t al­ways enough. Com­ing up with a so­lu­tion to the prob­lem also con­veys that you’re will­ing to put things right and that you’re aware of how not to make the same mis­take again.

5

“LET ME HAN­DLE IT”

When there is a cri­sis, your boss wants to know that she can rely on you to solve it. In­stead of just sit­ting back and watch­ing the prob­lem un­fold, show that you can take charge of the sit­u­a­tion, says El­fa­rina. She will be happy to know that you can think on your feet and make tough de­ci­sions, and will give you ex­tra credit for un­der­stand­ing that her time is bet­ter spent deal­ing with more im­por­tant mat­ters.

6 “I’VE DONE THE RE­SEARCH AND HAVE SOME IDEAS”

Your boss wants to see that you’ve come to a meet­ing pre­pared and that you have some­thing mean­ing­ful to con­trib­ute, says Jasveer Mal­lany, ex­ec­u­tive coach and trainer at Ac­quire Coach­ing. “Be some­one who can help move things along dur­ing a meet­ing and make sure that every­body’s time is spent pro­duc­tively. You will come across as some­one who is ef­fi­cient and has ini­tia­tive. You are also say­ing to your boss: ‘I want to be a part of this, I want to be in­volved.’”

7 “HOW CAN I FUR­THER MY CA­REER?”

Some­one else in your depart­ment got pro­moted over you? Don’t be re­sent­ful or com­plain about it. In­stead, show your boss that you take your job se­ri­ously and are in­vested in your ca­reer, sug­gests Yas­mine. Re­quest ex­tra train­ing, de­velop a stronger work ethic, and show that you’re pas­sion­ate about your role and the in­dus­try you’re in. Ex­press­ing am­bi­tion and a keen­ness to get ahead will put you on your boss’ radar when she con­sid­ers whom to pro­mote at the next per­for­mance ap­praisal.

8 “YOU WON’T NEED TO TELL ME TWICE”

This tells your boss that you un­der­stood her the first time and that you don’t need to be re­minded to get some­thing done, says Jasveer. The last thing any boss wants to do is to chase their staff and keep fol­low­ing up with them. You want to show her that you can be trusted to see a task through from the get-go and that you’ve reg­is­tered her in­struc­tions.

9 “I LOVE MY JOB!”

Higher-ups like to see that their em­ploy­ees are pas­sion­ate about what they do. Do not shy away from ex­press­ing this en­thu­si­asm, Jasveer ad­vises. “From a boss’ per­spec­tive, it’s al­ways great to see a team mem­ber re­ally rel­ish her role. Happy work­ers are usu­ally very good at what they do. They care about the qual­ity of work that they pro­duce and are se­ri­ous about mak­ing a great im­pres­sion.”

10 “OUR TEAM DID BRIL­LIANTLY. WE’RE AMAZ­ING!”

By speak­ing pos­i­tively about your team and ac­knowl­edg­ing every­body’s con­tri­bu­tions, you show that you are a team player. “Your peo­ple skills are what drive your ‘hard skills’ – that is, your mile­stones and KPIs (Key Per­for­mance In­di­ca­tors),” says El­fa­rina. “Bosses no­tice when you have good re­la­tion­ships with your peers and sub­or­di­nates. Team play­ers are great at mo­ti­vat­ing oth­ers and help­ing them be bet­ter work­ers in the process.”

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