CHOOSE VEG­GIES

Some fresh pro­duce can be tricky to buy – es­pe­cially when you can’t see what’s on the in­side. Here’s how to get it right ev­ery time.

Simply Her (Singapore) - - Home & Food How To - BY LIM TSIAO HUI

1 CABBAGES

Look For One that’s small and heavy, which in­di­cates that it’s fresh, juicy and has more lay­ers.

2 ONIONS

Look For A dry and pa­pery skin that is in­tact and free of black patches. Check that the tops have not sprouted, which could point to old stock and mois­ture ex­po­sure.

3 BIT­TER­GOURD

Look For A plump and volup­tuous gourd with shal­low grooves. Th­ese are signs that it is ma­ture and at its most avour­ful.

4 GIN­GER

Look For Bright and shiny skin, with no black spots. How­ever, the only way to gauge the in­ten­sity of the avour is to break off a knob and smell it.

5 CAU­LI­FLOWER AND BROC­COLI

Look For Tight, rm and fresh-smelling orets. Give it a sniff – there should be no hint of de­cay­ing odour.

6 LADY’S FIN­GERS

Look For Dark green ones with no brown or black patches. Choose small ones if you’ll be steam­ing or stir-fry­ing them – they are more ten­der, but more gooey. Larger ones are older and tougher, and are bet­ter for stews and cur­ries.

7 SWEET POTA­TOES

Look For Small ones, which are sweeter and have a more in­tense avour. The skin should be free of coin­sized black marks, which may in­di­cate that the sweet pota­toes have been farmed in soil that’s too wet (from too much rain) – the esh is likely to turn black when cut.

8 AS­PARA­GUS

Look For Firm and green stalks, es­pe­cially at the ends. As the tips are the rst to turn bad, check that they are com­pact and not de­cayed.

OUR EX­PERT:

Tai Seng Yee, ex­ec­u­tive di­rec­tor

of Zenxin Agri- or­ganic Food

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