HAND-TIED POSY IN A GLASS JAR

Simply Her (Singapore) - - Beauty News -

1 PICK & MIX

Flow­ers are not cheap in Sin­ga­pore, so Jaclyn sug­gests mix­ing pre­mium blooms like dahlias or peonies (from florists) with more af­ford­able ones like lilies, sweet wil­liams or spi­der chrysan­the­mums, which are eas­ily avail­able at wet mar­kets and su­per­mar­kets.

For the first ar­range­ment with her own re­cy­cled cof­fee bot­tle, Priscelia chooses pink dahlias, cham­pagne eu­stomas, pink astilbes and yel­low cras­pe­dia (billy but­tons).

2 PUTTING IT TO­GETHER

Jaclyn teaches Priscelia how to use the spi­ral tech­nique – where the stems over­lap one another to form a spi­ral. Priscelia takes the dahlias in her right hand, and uses her left to add smaller flow­ers to the ar­range­ment. For tex­ture, she adds pod-like billy but­tons in odd num­bers to liven up the posy and make it look less tra­di­tional.

She has some dif­fi­culty at first with the tech­nique. “I can’t in­sert the flow­ers prop­erly, and tak­ing any out messes up the bunch!” she sighs. But a quick note from Jaclyn to loosen her grip soon fixes that.

3 STRING­ING IT UP

When Priscelia is sat­is­fied with her ar­range­ment, she ties the bou­quet with twine. The flower lover then whips out a lace rib­bon she’s brought along and ties it over the mouth of the jar, adding a per­sonal touch to her cre­ation.

Fi­nally, Priscelia cuts the stems of the flow­ers at a 45- de­gree an­gle to cre­ate more sur­face area so that they can ab­sorb wa­ter more ef­fi­ciently. Fur­ther ad­vice from Jaclyn: “If your flow­ers are stand­ing too tall, cut the stems un­til the flow­ers sit nicely just above the open­ing.”

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Singapore

© PressReader. All rights reserved.