Mar­ket­ing brief­ing

Whilst in­flu­encer mar­ket­ing seems like the next big thing, mar­keters who do not do their home­work may run the risk of run­ning their own cam­paigns and ROIS into the ground.

Singapore Business Review - - CONTENTS -

When Sin­ga­pore’s Min­istry of Fi­nance de­cided to pro­mote their Bud­get 2018 cam­paign through young in­flu­encers on so­cial me­dia, they thought that the glitz and glam would do the trick. Far from it, the cam­paign back­fired as the sub­ject of se­ri­ous fi­nan­cial plan­ning did not quite fit in a cu­rated In­sta­gram feed show­cas­ing hol­i­day week­end trips, stay­cays, food splurges, and par­ties.

Clara Low, mar­ket­ing man­ager, Quorier, said that the topic of long-term fi­nan­cial plan­ning was not taken se­ri­ously in Sin­ga­pore be­cause young peo­ple are not at­tracted to the idea of be­ing as­so­ci­ated with a govern­ment ini­tia­tive. Whilst in­flu­encer mar­ket­ing seems like the next big thing, Low said that mar­keters who do not do their home­work may run the risk of run­ning their own cam­paigns and ROIS into the ground.

Mar­keters have been quick to jump in on the band­wagon called in­flu­encer mar­ket­ing, as it has proven to cre­ate not only brand aware­ness, but also brand res­o­nance, brand loy­alty, and brand ad­vo­cacy among tar­get mar­kets. Com­pared to phys­i­cal store vis­its and tra­di­tional ad­ver­tis­ing through ra­dio and TV, in­flu­encer mar­ket­ing is the most cost-ef­fec­tive cus­tomer ac­qui­si­tion chan­nel to­day.

Rel­e­vance, reach and res­o­nance

De­spite the fi­nan­cial plan­ning blun­der, the Sin­ga­pore govern­ment was able to pull off their en­vi­ron­men­tal cam­paign called #Cli­mate­ac­tionsg. Benny Chow, pro­ject mar­ket­ing man­ager, Fire­fly Pho­tog­ra­phy Pte Ltd, said that the cam­paign en­gaged many mi­cro-in­flu­encers to spread the mes­sage of en­vi­ron­men­tal aware­ness and govern­ment bud­get, gen­er­at­ing a lot of buzz and re­sult­ing in greater ex­po­sure through main­stream me­dia.

Cat Wil­liams, founder and CEO, Hu­man­i­sa­tion, said that in­flu­encers can be valu­able if a firm has a clear goal in mind. As in­flu­encer mar­ket­ing be­comes more pop­u­lar, in­flu­encers are also grow­ing to be less trans­ac­tional and more to­wards build­ing-long term re­la­tion­ships with brands. To en­sure that brands max­imise the ben­e­fits of in­flu­encer mar­ket­ing, Low said that mar­keters must keep in mind three things: rel­e­vance, reach, and res­o­nance.

For an in­flu­encer to be rel­e­vant, their per­son­al­ity, tone of voice, style, ad­vo­cates, in­ter­ests, and pos­si­bly even their world­views should be aligned with one’s brand. She said that it is un­think­able for @Pewdiedie to be flex­ing a skin­care ad on his so­cial me­dia.

Chow em­pha­sised that brands must be care­ful not to use in­flu­encers just be­cause they have a huge so­cial reach, as the lack of knowl­edge in a par­tic­u­lar field may re­sult in dev­as­tat­ing con­se­quences like me­dia back­lash.

“Mar­keters need to dive deeper into the num­bers and un­der­stand that hav­ing a big fol­low­ing count doesn’t equal to in­flu­ence and con­ver­sions. Dig through the com­ment sec­tions, an­a­lyse the re­ac­tions and en­gage­ments, in­ves­ti­gate if the fol­low­ers are au­then­tic and are not bots or paid fol­low­ers. Also, do keep an eye out for spon­sor­ship saturation - the last thing you want is an in­flu­encer to be la­beled a sell-out and for view­ers to be bom­barded with spon­sored ads,” Low added.

In terms of res­o­nance, mar­keters may ben­e­fit more from lead­ing trend­set­ters, de­ci­sion-mak­ers and tastemak­ers who do not nec­es­sar­ily have the largest fol­low­ings. For in­stance, Cir­cles.life suc­cess­fully pro­moted “20GB for

$20” by se­cretly en­gag­ing Sin­ga­porean duo Youtiao666 to van­dalise a “com­peti­tor’s” out-of-home as­sets while chal­leng­ing Sin­ga­pore’s po­lice to catch them on so­cial me­dia. Low said that this unique idea be­came vi­ral in Sin­ga­pore, in­creas­ing web­site traf­fic by up to 250x within just 24 hours. Fur­ther­more, some of th­ese in­flu­encers could be VS in­flu­encers who cre­ate con­tent on what’s trend­ing. Low said that mar­keters can of­ten dis­tin­guish VS in­flu­encers through ex­tremely di­verse top­ics of spon­sored ‘con­ver­sa­tion’, from a tech re­view in one post to a com­men­tary on the World Cup in an­other.

In­flu­encer mar­ket­ing can in­deed be in­flu­en­tial, even on a brand’s ROI. Chow said that an­a­lyt­ics is key, and the use of tools such as So­cial Baker is ex­tremely im­por­tant. Low added that mar­keters should avoid fo­cus­ing on sur­face met­rics such as likes and com­ments.

“Em­ploy the use of Google and Face­book An­a­lyt­ics and build up a list of track­ing key in­di­ca­tors such as web­site traf­fic, leads, and con­ver­sions directed from the re­spec­tive in­flu­encer. Sim­ple meth­ods like UTM pa­ram­e­ters (short text codes pegged to URLS to track) are a good start­ing point in pro­vid­ing data,” she added.

to en­sure that brands max­imise the ben­e­fits of in­flu­encer mar­ket­ing, mar­keters must keep in mind three things: rel­e­vance, reach, and res­o­nance.

Cir­cles.life suc­cess­fully pro­moted “20GB for $20” by se­cretly en­gag­ing Sin­ga­porean duo Youtiao666

Benny Chow

Clara Low

Cat Wil­liams

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