WHICH SLEEP­ING PO­SI­TION IS BEST FOR YOUR HEALTH?

From neck pain to snor­ing and heart­burn, our sleep pos­ture af­fects our health. Here are the pros and cons of the most com­mon sleep po­si­tions:

Singapore Women's Weekly (Singapore) - - SLEEP SPECIAL -

PROS:

The foetal po­si­tion pro­vides a sense of se­cu­rity – it re­minds us of child­hood and be­ing young and care­free. So it can help shrug off stress. Stud­ies found peo­ple who favour the foetal po­si­tion – mostly women – tend to have a tough ex­te­rior, but can be shy un­der­neath.

CONS:

Of­ten when we are curled up we clench our hands and that cre­ates pres­sure on our carpal tun­nel. Carpal tun­nel syn­drome is a painful con­di­tion af­fect­ing the hands and fin­gers, and is caused by com­pres­sion of a ma­jor ner ve in the hand and wrist. So if you like to sleep like a baby, be sure to keep your hands loose.

PROS:

If you have heart­burn or re­flux, sleep­ing on your left eases symp­toms. Side sleep­ing may also re­duce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, as it ef­fi­ciently clears our brain of meta­bolic waste prod­ucts that build up while we’re awake.

CONS:

Your legs col­lapse on to each other, drag­ging down the hips and putting pres­sure on the lower back. “Sleep with your knees slightly bent and with a pil­low in­be­tween so your legs are evenly po­si­tioned,” says chi­ro­prac­tor Dr An­drew Lawrence. A study in Turkey also found sleep­ing on the left side was as­so­ci­ated with night­mares, al­though re­searchers don’t know ex­actly why.

PROS:

Re­searchers agree this is the worst po­si­tion of the bunch, but not if you like vivid dreams! Front sleep­ers have the most ex­cit­ing and racy dreams, say re­searchers from Hong Kong’s Shue Yan Univer­sity. The frontal po­si­tion with your arms raised to the side is also good for di­ges­tion, as the in­ter­nal or­gans are in the best spot.

CONS:

Sleep­ing face down cre­ates ten­sion around the base of the skull, lead­ing to headaches and stiff­ness in the neck area. Peo­ple who sleep on their stom­achs were found to be less self-con­fi­dent,as fa­cial con­tact with the pil­low was pre­dic­tive of neg­a­tive emo­tions.

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