I made this

MB&F Horo­log­i­cal Ma­chine No. 6 Space Pi­rate

Stuff Singapore - - CONTENTS - by Max­i­m­il­ian Busser

Max Busser makes art, not watches

“THIS IS KI­NETIC ART THAT GIVES TIME,IT’S NOT YOUR TYP­I­CAL WATCH SO IT DOESN’T SIT BE­TWEEN YOUR TYP­I­CAL DIG­I­TAL OR ANA­LOG WATCHES. THIS SHOULD PROB­A­BLY BE SOLD IN AN ART GALLERY”

The HM6 Space Pi­rate has been four years in the mak­ing, and it goes back to my child­hood, as all my horo­log­i­cal ma­chines do.

I was in­spired by one of the cartoons I used to watch as a kid, called Cap­tain Fu­ture. He had this space­ship called the Cy­ber­lab, and it had two spheres and a cylin­der in the mid­dle. And I thought, “wouldn’t it be cool if we had two of those sets of spheres?”.

Four years of in­tense tech­no­log­i­cal chal­lenges later (be­cause watch­mak­ing had to meet mi­cro en­gi­neer­ing), we man­aged to come up with this ab­so­lutely in­sane move­ment. It’s made of ti­ta­nium, it’s in an ul­tra­light cage even though it’s got 550 com­po­nents, and it’s even got con­i­cal gears (gears at 90-de­grees in­stead of flat against one another). This is only the sec­ond time in the his­tory of watch­mak­ing that con­i­cal gears are be­ing used.

This is ki­netic art that gives time; it’s not your typ­i­cal watch so it doesn’t sit be­tween your typ­i­cal dig­i­tal or ana­log watches. This should prob­a­bly be sold in an art gallery. One of the many things that dif­fer­en­ti­ates art from de­sign is the cre­ative process – the artist is ex­tremely self­ish and doesn’t give a damn if you like it or not, and that’s how it is with my watches.

From the age of four, I’ve wanted to be a car de­signer, so up till my teenage years, I used to de­sign cars all the time. This trans­lated into my pro­fes­sional life, and when I first started out I was cre­at­ing prod­ucts to please more peo­ple, to sell more stuff, and to make more money.

And half of th­ese prod­ucts I cre­ated, I didn’t like.

So I thought, if I wanted to be proud of my­self, I’ve got to cre­ate what I be­lieve in and that was when MB&F was born. We’re un­like other watch brands be­cause we de­con­struct tra­di­tional watch mak­ing, and re­con­struct it into 3D ki­netic art which gives you the time – but that’s not the point. We’re all about cre­at­ing th­ese in­cred­i­ble art pieces.

Smart­watches may take over the world one day, but not in the for­mat they ex­ist in now. It’s like when the iPhone came out every­body went “what the hell is that?” and now, we’ve all got some­thing like it. For me at least, the fu­ture of the smart­watch is health and lo­gis­tics-re­lated.

But I’ll never, ever, ever in­te­grate that as­pect into my work be­cause I’m a me­chan­i­cal artist, and any­thing that’s to do with elec­tron­ics has ab­so­lutely no place at all in what I do. After all, there’s no prac­ti­cal point to what I do, so why would I put some­thing prac­ti­cal in it?

Peo­ple buy me­chan­i­cal watches not to tell the time but for sta­tus. So the real ques­tion is, if peo­ple will be wear­ing two watches – one to tell them their fit­ness level or sleep pat­terns and such on one wrist, and a work of art on the other. That’s what I hope will hap­pen.

More im­por­tantly, what I do can be re­paired in 100 years. You can’t do that with dig­i­tal de­vices – you can only chuck it away. Smart watches will be dis­pos­able rub­bish just after a few years, un­like our work.

IN­GENI-O-ME­TER

Clas­sic func­tion, but fu­tur­is­tic form

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