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Get ac­quainted with a Swiss wine rem­i­nis­cent of Grüner Velt­liner and a lush red blend from Ge­or­gia

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Get ac­quainted with a Swiss wine rem­i­nis­cent of Grüner Velt­liner and a lush red blend from Ge­or­gia

VILLA SANDI, VALDOBBIADENE PROS­ECCO SUPERIORE, EX­TRA DRY Valdobbiadene, Veneto

With the muggy heat blan­ket­ing us these days, stock­ing up on sparkling quenchers is a pri­or­ity. Villa Sandi’s Ex­tra Dry Pros­ecco is one of those breezy wines you can drink on its own or as an aper­i­tif. (Note: In Pros­ecco wine­mak­ing jar­gon, ‘Ex­tra Dry’ isn’t ex­actly bone dry but still of­fers a lit­tle sweet­ness.) Made from grapes sourced from the DOCG vine­yards of Valdobbiadene, the straw-yel­low wine is vi­brant and re­fresh­ing, of­fer­ing crisp notes of ap­ple and pear, and a beau­ti­ful flo­ral fin­ish that draws you back for sec­onds.

$39, from The B.I.G Wine Com­pany. Tel: 9235 1709

WIRRA WIRRA, CATAPULT SHIRAZ 2016 McLaren Vale, South Aus­tralia

While South Aus­tralian Shiraz has a gen­eral im­age of a mas­cu­line fruit bomb, it pays to re­mem­ber that sub­re­gional dif­fer­ences do ex­ist, giv­ing the sig­na­ture red grape a sur­pris­ing range of unique ex­pres­sions.

McLaren Vale, South Aus­tralia’s other key wine turf af­ter Barossa Val­ley, is more of a gen­tle beast with a mod­er­ate Mediter­ranean weather vis-à-vis Barossa’s mer­cury-bust­ing Con­ti­nen­tal cli­mate. The more tem­per­ate con­di­tions mean McLaren Vale’s Shi­razes of­ten have a lighter tex­ture and a more pro­nounced acid­ity. Wirra Wirra win­ery’s Catapult Shiraz 2016—the moniker was in­spired by its late wine­maker Greg Trott’s de­sire to sling­shot some wines to their neigh­bours— has all the trade­marks of a top McLaren Vale Shiraz. The bou­quet flaunts a rich aroma of rasp­ber­ries and blue­ber­ries, while the mid-palate is soft with notes of mint, black pep­per and cher­ries. Pair this with roast duck or stewed pork. $51.50, from Vin­tage Fine Wines. Tel: 6801 4012

TELIANI VAL­LEY, CABER­NET-SAPERAVI 2016 Kakheti, Ge­or­gia

Tongue-twist­ing, con­so­nant-heavy names aside, Ge­or­gian wines have found their way onto restau­rant wine lists and the hon­our rolls of in­ter­na­tional wine awards. The wines are ex­cit­ing ter­ri­tory for oenophiles, but there’s no deny­ing the quaffs, es­pe­cially the red am­brosias, can be an ac­quired taste.

For ex­am­ple, the dark-skinned Saperavi, for all its inky, juicy rich­ness, can be a lit­tle too acidic for new­com­ers. Teliani Val­ley has made Saperavi a lit­tle friend­lier on the palate—by blend­ing the wine with 50 per cent of Caber­net Sauvignon to add a savoury, fruitier el­e­ment and tone down its smoky note. The wine is fer­mented in oak vats and aged in bar­rels for a year, re­sult­ing in a pleas­ant, rounded tex­ture. $49, from Lileo Wines Sin­ga­pore. Tel: 6694 2555

FATTORIA LE PUPILLE, SAFFREDI 2015 Tus­cany, Italy

Here’s a Su­per Tus­can gem to put away in the cel­lar. Saffredi is con­sid­ered by many to be Fattoria Le Pupille’s top vino. De­spite some at­tempts to change the blend’s com­po­nents over the decades, the wine has now adopted a sig­na­ture Bordeaux-style makeup of Caber­net Sauvignon, Mer­lot and Petit Ver­dot. The 2015 vin­tage is an­other star in the mak­ing: medium-bod­ied, with a lush, gor­geous core of black­cur­rants, cof­fee and spices. Tan­nins are grippy, while the fin­ish rounds up ac­cents of dried leaves and dark choco­late. $154, from An­gra Wine & Spirit. Tel: 6532 7791

PROVINS, VALAIS MUNDI, ECLAT, PE­TITE ARVINE 2016 Valais, Switzer­land

Switzer­land makes wines from 15,000 hectares of vine­yards but ex­ports only two per cent of its pro­duc­tion, which is quite a pity. The cool cli­mate wines de­serve a wider au­di­ence in­stead of be­ing a best kept se­cret among lo­cal oenophiles.

We were swoon­ing over Pe­tite Arvine, a white grape much revered in the moun­tain­ous Valais re­gion, at a re­cent Swiss wine tast­ing or­gan­ised by Provins win­ery. Aged in French oak for nine months, in­clud­ing three months on the lees, the wine boasts a taut acid­ity, notes of grape­fruit and lemon, and a stony, flo­ral fin­ish. If served blind, we would have thought it was a zesty Grüner Velt­liner from Aus­tria. Sip this along with some raclette or oys­ters. $168, from Wine Concierge. Tel: 9634 2826

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