MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE灰姑娘的舞衣

So much work goes into pro­duc­ing a spec­ta­cle for the au­di­ence, says Chi­hiro Uchida, Sin­ga­pore Dance Theatre’s prin­ci­pal artist, who of­fers a glimpse into the re­spon­si­bil­i­ties and team ef­fort be­hind the glam­our and glit­ter of bal­let新加坡舞蹈剧场舞者内田千裕最初学舞,是因为喜欢漂

ZbBZ (Singapore) - - FOCUS - TEXT WANG YIMING / 王一鸣PHOTOGRAPHY 龙国雄

Girls are of­ten drawn to bal­let be­cause of the pretty cos­tumes and glit­tery makeup that bal­leri­nas wear. That was cer­tainly the case for Chi­hiro Uchida, the prin­ci­pal artist at the Sin­ga­pore Dance Theatre.

She typ­i­cally wears more ac­ces­sories than your av­er­age per­former on stage, for she is the fe­male lead af­ter all.

“I would choose ac­ces­sories that are shinier and more re­flec­tive so that even if the au­di­ence can­not see them clearly they would be able to see the light re­flected in the eyes, on the face or on the clothes,” says Uchida. “It lights up the en­tire per­son and with a lit­tle more shine, one’s con­fi­dence lev­els soar too.”

Her words bring to mind the bal­let Jew­els writ­ten by Ge­orge Balan­chine in 1967, a piece that was in­spired by the work of jew­eller Van Cleef & Ar­pels. Each of the three acts in Jew­els has a gem theme: emer­ald, ruby and di­a­mond. To say the work is daz­zling is an un­der­state­ment.

The mar­riage be­tween bal­let and jew­ellery is a won­der­ful story in the global his­tory of art. Uchida her­self has graced the run­way as a jew­ellery model at Sin­ga­pore Fash­ion Week on two oc­ca­sions.

On stage, Uchida is care­ful with what she wears, so they would not swing about and in­ter­fere with her per­for­mance. She typ­i­cally pins long neck­laces to her cos­tume, and avoids heavy or long ear­rings.

Dancers both male and fe­male are re­spon­si­ble for their own per­for­mance make-up, from their foun­da­tion to the fi­nal touches. Only when tech­ni­cally dif­fi­cult looks are re­quired are pro­fes­sional make-up artists called in.

“Our stage make-up may look very strong and dra­matic when seen up close. This is

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