The Coach

Limit weight gain – with­out lim­it­ing the fes­tive blowout!

Bicycling (South Africa) - - CONTENTS - By Mark Car­roll

Dread­ing what the fes­tive feast­ing will do to your weight? Fear not, we have the per­fect so­lu­tion – you can eat plenty and still keep off the ki­los.

I’M SURE MANY OF YOU HAVE SET CY­CLING GOALS FOR 2015, AND WOULDN’T MIND AR­RIV­ING THERE IN GREAT SHAPE.

How­ever, ’ tis the sea­son to be jolly, and keep­ing weight off is jolly hard. But fear not; here is my three- step strat­egy to keep you rid­ing – and keep­ing the weight off – while en­joy­ing the hol­i­day fes­tiv­i­ties.

CHANGE THINGS UP

With min­i­mal rac­ing hap­pen­ing this month, it’s a good time to mix up your rid­ing and hit new routes, to keep your train­ing fresh. Given the longer days, there’s even time to fit in some week­day rides in the early morn­ing or late af­ter­noon.

Moun­tain bik­ing cer­tainly gives a good full-body work­out, so if all you nor­mally ride is road, then hit some trails – they add a whole new thrill to the sport.

The added bonus to all this, of course, is that you’ll cre­ate a kilo­joule deficit, which will al­low you to eat a bit more when the par­ties come round; and if you don’t eat as much as you’ve burned off, you could ac­tu­ally lose some un­wanted mass.

Be con­scious, though, of main­tain­ing a de­cent (and con­tin­u­ous) out­put – heart rate 70-80%, on long rides – so you con­sume a rea­son­able amount of en­ergy while stim­u­lat­ing ex­cel­lent aer­o­bic adap­ta­tions. A three-hour ride at 200 watts av­er­age power, for ex­am­ple, will use around 2 400kCal, or 10 000 kilo­joules.

EAT HEALTHILY – AROUND THE PAR­TIES

There isn’t a party on ev­ery night; so be con­scious of your qual­ity real-food choices and por­tion con­trol, so that when the get­to­geth­ers do hap­pen, you can en­joy your­self guilt-free.

Choose your food care­fully for on-the-bike nu­tri­tion, too. You may dis­cover a rev­e­la­tion in the way you feel and per­form when you take the time and ef­fort to pre­pare your own fresh food, rather than set­tling for the con­ve­nience of a gel or bar.

STAVE OFF HUNGER PANGS

Of­ten, thirst can be dis­guised as hunger; so develop the habit of drink­ing reg­u­larly, rather than only when you feel thirsty.

The mo­ment you fin­ish your ride, have a choco­late milk, chicken sand­wich, or sim­i­lar. Most peo­ple try to start their ‘diet’ right af­ter a ride – that’s never worked, and it never will. You need to re­fuel for train­ing adap­ta­tions; and if you don’t eat right away, se­ri­ous hunger pangs will fol­low, mak­ing you eat more than you should when you even­tu­ally cave in.

Fi­nally, don’t re­ward goals with sweets and choco­lates – rather save the money, and cel­e­brate your achieve­ments with new toys for your bike on Christ­mas Day.

Mark Car­roll is the owner of Ca­dence Cy­cling Per­for­mance

(ca­dence­cy­cling. co. za) and chair of the Cy­cling South Africa ( CSA)

Coach­ing Com­mis­sion.

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