I’M GET­TING TIRED OF DE­STROY­ING CHEAP MOUN­TAIN BIKES. I’M LOOK­ING TO UP­GRADE, BUT I’M NOT SURE I CAN AF­FORD TO, AND IF IT’S WORTH THE MONEY TO DO IT. SOME AD­VICE PLEASE?

Bicycling (South Africa) - - ASK -

Cheap department- store moun­tain bikes of­ten come with less sturdy com­po­nents, are hastily as­sem­bled, and of­ten aren’t made for the rigours of real moun­tain bik­ing. And it’s al­most im­pos­si­ble to find a Makro em­ployee with the same knowl­edge as a bike- shop worker.

Most en­try- level big- brand moun­tain bikes cost un­der R15 000, and they’ll last longer and re­quire less ex­pen­sive main­te­nance than cheaper de­part­mentstore mod­els.

If you do the sums and con­sider what you’ve spent on re­pairs and buy­ing the same cheap bike over and over again com­pared to that R15 000, it’s easy to see why pay­ing a bit more up front pays off in the long run. This is also the first step to­wards look­ing less like a novice, and more like the sea­soned rider you want to be.

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