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CityPress - - Tenders - SU­SAN PA­TEL projects@city­press.co.za WHAT YOU’D LIKE TO DO ABOUT WHAT OTH­ERS WILL PAY FOR IDEAL CUS­TOMERS YOUR MAR­KET­ING AND BUSI­NESS PLANS UP YOUR BUSI­NESS ON A SMALL SCALE FEED­BACK AND AD­JUST A TEAM FI­NANC­ING UP THE STRUC­TURE OF YOUR COM­PANY

re you frus­trated and fed up with your job? Well, don’t de­spair. You have op­tions. One is to quit your job; another is to start a com­pany. It is pos­si­ble to tran­si­tion suc­cess­fully from em­ployee to en­tre­pre­neur, but it’s a lit­tle more com­plex than that. Here are 12 steps you will need to take to be­come your own boss:

Some peo­ple call this find­ing your pas­sion, but it’s more than that. Think about your skills, abil­i­ties and ex­pe­ri­ence. Con­sider what you can re­al­is­ti­cally see your­self do­ing for hours each day, for weeks and years.

A vi­able busi­ness is the in­ter­sec­tion be­tween what you’d like to do and what oth­ers will pay for.

Find a few peo­ple who you think would be your ideal clients. Ask them about their big­gest needs, fears and as­pi­ra­tions re­lated to the busi­ness idea you plan to pur­sue. Are the ben­e­fits of your prod­uct or ser­vice in line with their real needs? Also, make a note of the words they use be­cause they’ll even­tu­ally help make your mar­ket­ing more au­then­tic.

To­day’s mar­ket­ing in­volves con­tent cre­ation, so­cial media, email out­reach, and more. Make sure you know how you’ll ap­proach each of these av­enues to in­tro­duce your idea to cus­tomers. At the same time, lay out a busi­ness plan that de­tails how you in­tend your busi­ness to func­tion. It doesn’t need to be in­cred­i­bly for­mal, but it does need to cover your op­er­at­ing struc­ture, prod­uct, de­liv­ery sys­tems and ex­pan­sion plans.

If you can, test your com­pany idea by launch­ing on a small scale on the side, while still work­ing your day job. This gives you a no-risk op­por­tu­nity to test your ideas, get your first clients and see if the busi­ness will hold up over time be­fore you leave the se­cu­rity of your cur­rent po­si­tion.

Run­ning a small-scale op­er­a­tion will help you de­ter­mine which parts of your idea are great and which parts need ad­just­ing. Take cus­tomer feed­back se­ri­ously and make any nec­es­sary changes be­fore you be­gin scal­ing up.

If your idea seems vi­able, de­ter­mine who you’ll want on your busi­ness lead­er­ship team when you even­tu­ally launch full time. Depend­ing on your per­sonal ex­pe­ri­ence, you may need help in ar­eas such as fi­nance, mar­ket­ing, cus­tomer ser­vice and pro­duc­tion.

For a small ven­ture, this might mean sav­ing up some money to get through the first few months, or tak­ing cash from your sav­ings. If your as­pi­ra­tions are a bit larger, you may need to think about how to pro­cure ven­ture cap­i­tal or other out­side in­vest­ment.

At the same time, you’ll also want to de­cide what kind of com­pany struc­ture to register. Get this taken care

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