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CityPress - - Business - COM­PILED BY AN­GELIQUE RUZICKA

PICK N PAY’S APP GETS

10 000 DOWNLOADS IN 24 HOURS

Pick n Pay’s lat­est ver­sion of its mo­bile app got down­loaded 10 000 times in 24 hours af­ter it was re­leased this month. This week, the iPhone ver­sion was re­leased. It en­ables shop­pers to ac­cess the Smart Shop­per kiosk in the palm of their hands.

New fea­tures on the app in­clude:

. Bar­code scanner: Users can scan any prod­uct and in­stantly add it to their shop­ping lists;

. New recipes monthly, with the abil­ity to add the in­gre­di­ents to a shop­ping list;

. The abil­ity to ac­cess pur­chase his­tory and add items from the shop­ping his­tory to a shop­ping list;

. Eas­ily load per­sonal dis­counts and Smart Shop­per points to a Smart Shop­per card;

. A list of Pick n Pay’s lat­est top 10 weekly specials, which can be added to a shop­ping list;

. Ac­cess to Pick n Pay ac­count state­ments; and

. The func­tion­al­ity to buy elec­tric­ity, data and air­time us­ing Smart Shop­per points.

The app also en­ables you to use your per­sonal dis­counts in-store and to search for prod­ucts, shop and check out faster. Ge­orgina Muir­head, head of cus­tomer ex­pe­ri­ence for PnP On­line, said that the re­tailer would be adding fur­ther en­hance­ments in the months ahead.

FSB WARNS THE PUBLIC AGAINST LOVE AND LETS LIVE

The Fi­nan­cial Ser­vices Board has is­sued a warn­ing to the public not to con­duct fi­nan­cial ser­vices-re­lated busi­ness with Love and Lets Live (Pty) Ltd.

Love and Lets Live has been invit­ing mem­bers of the public to in­vest in its on­line trad­ing plat­form (in forex), promis­ing po­ten­tial in­vestors monthly re­turns of 8%. Love and Lets Live is not au­tho­rised as a fi­nan­cial ser­vices provider (FSP) and is not a rep­re­sen­ta­tive of an au­tho­rised FSP. Per­sons ren­der­ing fi­nan­cial ser­vices with­out a li­cence or with­out be­ing ap­pointed as rep­re­sen­ta­tives are act­ing in con­tra­ven­tion of the Fi­nan­cial Ad­vi­sory and In­ter­me­di­ary Ser­vices Act. Such con­tra­ven­tion is an of­fence that car­ries a heavy fine or pe­riod of im­pris­on­ment.

CAPITEC IDEN­TI­FIES HABITS OF HIGHLY IN­DEBTED PEO­PLE

Capitec has sin­gled out seven habits that it be­lieves end up re­sult­ing in peo­ple ac­cu­mu­lat­ing vast amounts of debt. Re­search sug­gests it takes 66 days on av­er­age to break one habit and re­place it with a new be­hav­iour or pat­tern. The seven habits in­clude:

. Avoid­ing the full pic­ture – ig­nor­ing the debt and pre­tend­ing ev­ery­thing is okay.

. Pay­ing min­i­mum amounts on cards. “Pay­ing the min­i­mum on your credit ac­count in­stal­ment can cost you a for­tune in in­ter­est,” says Capitec.

. Us­ing debt to pay debt.

. Miss­ing pay­ments and not pay­ing debts on time.

. Ra­tio­nal­is­ing ir­ra­tional pur­chases.

. Adopt­ing un­sus­tain­able credit habits, such as adopt­ing the buy-now-pay-later men­tal­ity.

. Keep­ing up with the Jone­ses. “Be­fore ac­quir­ing ‘wants’ be­cause oth­ers have th­ese items, ask your­self: What value will this item add to my life, how will it add value to the lives of my de­pen­dents, what sac­ri­fices do I have to make to have it?” ad­vises Capitec.

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