BE­COM­ING Mrs Jones

...AND WHY MIN­NIE’S MAN HATES THE FAME

CityPress - - Front Page - RHODÉ MAR­SHALL rhode.mar­shall@city­press.co.za

Not too long ago the coun­try’s TV dar­ling, Min­nie Dlamini, be­came Mrs Jones. Later this week, fans and fol­low­ers will get to ex­pe­ri­ence her jour­ney in her three-part do­cuseries Be­com­ing Mrs Jones.

To­wards the end of last year, Dlamini an­nounced her en­gage­ment to Quin­ton Jones, send­ing waves through so­cial me­dia. Notic­ing how the na­tion keenly fol­lowed the new de­vel­op­ment in the pre­vi­ously shel­tered re­la­tion­ship of two years, Dlamini de­cided to take charge.

“I didn’t want to hide the fact that I was en­gaged or take off my ring when out in pub­lic,” Dlamini told City Press this week. So she, to­gether with her pro­duc­tion com­pany Beau­ti­ful Day Pro­duc­tions, de­cided to tell her story her way.

“I wanted to de­cide what the nar­ra­tive is my­self, give the peo­ple what they want while mak­ing sure that it’s an au­then­tic story,” she said on the phone.

In a first for lo­cal tele­vi­sion, Be­com­ing Mrs Jones is a deeply per­sonal crafted series that gives Dlamini’s fans a glimpse into the cel­e­bra­tion and emo­tions that the cou­ple and their fam­i­lies ex­pe­ri­ence while plan­ning and cel­e­brat­ing the union.

In the first episode, view­ers get to know Dlamini through the eyes of those clos­est to her and ex­pe­ri­ence the process be­hind plan­ning the wed­ding as well as prepa­ra­tions for the tra­di­tional and west­ern cer­e­monies.

“I’m so proud of this series! From be­ing the ex­ec­u­tive pro­ducer, to the high-qual­ity re­sources we in­vested in the pro­duc­tion and the in­cred­i­bly tal­ented cre­atives and crew we col­lab­o­rated with, the re­sult is this ex­quis­ite body of work that is an hon­est and visual rep­re­sen­ta­tion of my heart dur­ing the most beau­ti­ful and in­ti­mate time of my life, and I’m so thrilled to be able to share it with you,” she added.

Asked how she con­vinced her very pri­vate hus­band to par­tic­i­pate in the record­ing of the show, she said: “He was en­tirely against it but in the end un­der­stood why it was im­por­tant to me.

“In the end I re­ally wanted to con­trol how our story is told and avoid a cir­cus.”

Dlamini says Jones (who also works in tele­vi­sion – they met seven years ago while both work­ing at Ur­ban Brew Stu­dios) is very cam­era and me­dia shy.

“He made it clear that we’re not do­ing this again,” she says laugh­ing.

About whether the en­er­getic Dlamini ever felt that the cam­eras were in­tru­sive, she says: “I gave a clear brief and syn­op­sis. While the show is very per­sonal, it wasn’t in­tru­sive at all. But we want to give our fans and fol­low­ers a trans­par­ent tele­vi­sion ex­pe­ri­ence.”

Still, she says, it was the most stress­ful ex­pe­ri­ence of her life – like for any bride.

Dlamini says she has never spo­ken as much about her hus­band whom she wed in a star-stud­ded cer­e­mony in Cape Town last month, as she has this week.

About the most im­por­tant part of any wed­ding, both her wed­ding gowns were de­signed by Gert Jo­han Coet­zee.

“We had Swarovski laser-cut leaves im­ported from Aus­tria. My whole dress was en­crusted in the crys­tals. I gave Gert the brief to look like a fairy-tale princess, as it has al­ways been my dream to look like a Dis­ney princess. He knocked it out the park,” she said.

“I want the view­ers to feel warm and fuzzy go­ing along the jour­ney of a beau­ti­ful love story.”

Watch Be­com­ing Mrs Jones on Fri­day, Oc­to­ber 13, at 7.30pm on VUZU Amp (DStv chan­nel 103)

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