ro­man­tic in­ter­lude

A SUB­TLE IN­TER­PLAY OF SCULP­TURAL TERRACING AND LAY­ERED PLANT­ING PAINTS AN ARTFUL PIC­TURE IN THIS CAPE TOWN GAR­DEN

Condé Nast House & Garden - - DESIGN NOTES -

While land­scap­ing trends come and go, the ap­peal of a stylish fam­ily gar­den re­mains time­less. add a rush of an­nu­als and peren­ni­als that re­ver­ber­ate through the space and you have the per­fect mix.

Visions of this dream des­ti­na­tion oc­cu­pied the owner’s mind well be­fore the plans of their house were drawn up. ‘our home was never go­ing to be just bricks and mor­tar, but in­ti­mately con­nected to the gar­den,’ she re­calls.

Land­scape de­signer car­rie La­timer was called in to cre­ate a fam­ily-friendly gar­den that bal­anced struc­ture and swaths of ro­man­tic plant­ing. gra­cious, fem­i­nine and well-es­tab­lished, like the ones the owner of­ten vis­its when in eng­land.

as the prop­erty creeps along the Lies­beek river green­belt, it has a nat­u­ral west-to-east drop. car­rie made sense of the slope by sculpt­ing ter­races that re­late to the home’s ar­chi­tec­ture. ‘When the foun­da­tions were dug, a mam­moth pile of boul­ders emerged. We split these and used them to cre­ate the low ter­race walls through­out the gar­den,’ she ex­plains.

The slight level changes – no ter­race is 80cm higher than the one pre­ced­ing it – gave the land­scape de­signer scope to zone the gar­den into a se­ries in­ter­con­nect­ing rooms. ‘It was im­por­tant that each ter­race didn’t tell a dif­fer­ent story, but that the nar­ra­tive moved slowly and changed gen­tly,’ ex­plains car­rie.

The de­sign plays on the idea of var­i­ous routes and cross­ings cre­at­ing dif­fer­ent jour­neys and des­ti­na­tions in the gar­den. From the or­chard and meadow punc­tu­ated by a quaint green­house, paths open and in­vite one from one space to the next.

around the house, there’s a gen­tle bal­ance be­tween for­mal and re­laxed. off the guest ter­race, a peace­ful, sim­ple space is dom­i­nated by a large, ex­ist­ing oak tree and a dis­play of

Ja­panese anemone.

The kitchen court­yard is a quiet an­techam­ber be­fore the pièce de ré­sis­tance – rose arches brim­ming with scented Rosa ‘comtesse Pa­narosa’, Rosa ‘Moon­light Pa­narosa’ and trails of star jas­mine (Trach­e­losper­mum jas­mi­noides).

Lin­ing the main lawn ter­race, rib­bons of richly lay­ered plant­ing ex­ude a sense of old-world charm, while or­der is im­posed by a gravel path­way. Be­yond lies the robinia tree-framed pool ter­race.

‘The over­all ef­fect might be sim­ple at a glance. But upon closer in­spec­tion, there is plenty to hold your at­ten­tion, as de­tails re­veal them­selves in­cre­men­tally,’ ex­plains car­rie. serene yet evoca­tive; just as the owner had wanted it.

While the gar­den boasts all the de­sign clout one would ex­pect from a land­scaped space, for the owner it rep­re­sents a trea­sure trove of me­mories and love.

‘Its charm lies in the echoes of ev­ery cel­e­bra­tion, chil­dren’s laugh­ter, games and par­ties,’ she notes.

Much to her plea­sure, the riot of blooms through­out the gar­den can­not al­ways be kept in check. It’s this sense of con­tained abun­dance that res­onates most with her. ‘I think it pru­dent to have a gar­den plan, but not be a slave to it.’

More than any­thing, the gar­den gives ex­pres­sion to the owner’s love af­fair with plants. as a stylist, she of­ten picks blousy flow­ers for her home. Bowls of fra­grant roses, lopped-off blos­som branches and long stems with pom-pom shaped vibur­num are among her favourites. From the veg­etable gar­den, posies of herbs and artichoke are picked for the kitchen.

ev­ery fresh pick­ing is a re­minder of a sea­son well lived. ‘all you need to un­der­stand about life you will learn as a gar­dener. If you watch and lis­ten care­fully, it will tell you what it needs.’ Car­rie La­timer 8 car­riela­timer.co.za n

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.