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Cosmopolitan (South Africa) - - REPORT -

All Good

This is the place where your emo­tions should sit on a typ­i­cal day. It doesn’t mean you have a perma-grin, but you get joy out of things you like, and if any­thing throws you o , you’re able to han­dle it. Re­mem­ber what this feels like, so you know when some­thing is o .

Hav­ing a Bad Day

A case of the blahs ev­ery now and then is typ­i­cal, and usu­ally the re­sult of some­thing sit­u­a­tional, such as fail­ing a test. You may be frus­trated, dis­ap­pointed or sad, but you’re able to ig­ure out a way to feel bet­ter rather quickly.

In a Funk

This of­ten comes on af­ter some­thing ma­jor rocks your world, such as a big ight with a BFF. You may feel de­pressed (lack of en­ergy, not up for see­ing friends, no ap­petite) but in re­al­ity you’ve just hit a men­tal-health rough patch that will only last for a few days or so.

MAKE A LIST (OR READ THAT LIST)

When­ever you’re re­ally not feel­ing your­self, go into your Notes app and type out some of the things that put you in a great mood. Know­ing what gives you a lift is em­pow­er­ing and al­lows you to have a sense of con­trol over your emo­tional well­be­ing. When you’re a lit­tle down, th­ese things can dou­ble as self-care strate­gies.

SEARCH A HAPPY HASH­TAG OR AC­COUNT

Some­times all it takes to feel bet­ter is con­nect­ing with other peo­ple who can un­der­stand what you’re go­ing through. For­get the pic­ture-per­fect ac­counts, and check out @beth­draw­sthings or @sad­girlsclub for a pick-me-up.

TALK IT OUT WITH SOME­ONE YOU TRUST

When you keep bad feel­ings cooped up in your brain, they can seem like a big­ger deal than they are. Con­nect with a friend, par­ent or mem­ber of your faith com­mu­nity, and be hon­est about what you’re go­ing through. You will be amazed at how much bet­ter you might feel just by say­ing, ‘I’m not feel­ing so great.’

TALK IT OUT WITH SOME­ONE YOU TRUST – BUT NEXTLEVEL

Some men­tal­health prob­lems, such as de­pres­sion or se­vere anx­i­ety, war­rant the help of a trained pro­fes­sional – so make a plan to speak to a coun­sel­lor, doc­tor or ther­a­pist. Your feel­ings are noth­ing to be ashamed of.

De­pressed

You haven’t been your­self for more than two weeks, and you can’t ix it. You may have no in­ter­est in your fave things – you feel sad, an­gry, ir­ri­ta­ble and hol­low, and ex­pe­ri­ence a sense of doom. You may also have changes in your sleep or ap­petite, un­ex­plained aches and trou­ble get­ting out of bed.

Sui­ci­dal

You have thoughts of hurt­ing your­self, and they don’t go away af­ter a few sec­onds. You also may be think­ing about a speci ic way to end your life and have a sense that there is no other op­tion. Ei­ther way, this is an emer­gency – and must be treated as one.

REACH OUT FOR IM­ME­DI­ATE AS­SIS­TANCE

You need help this very minute. That’s right: This. Very. Minute. And there is some­one wait­ing to talk to you right now: call SADAG on ( 0800 121 314.

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