VOLVO OCEAN RACE

ALI­CANTE, LO­CATED ON SPAIN’S SOUTH-EASTERN COSTA BLANCA AND THE CAP­I­TAL OF ALI­CANTE PROV­INCE IS NOT ONLY HOME TO GOR­GEOUS BEACHES, CHARM­INGLY NAR­ROW STREETS, COLOUR­FUL HOUSES, AND A BUSTLING NIGHTLIFE, IT IS ALSO THE START­ING POINT OF THE WORLDRENOWNED VO

Driven - - Contents - Re­port by MONIQUE VAN­DER­LIN­DEN | Images © QUICK­PIC

The big­gest ocean race kicks off

The Volvo Ocean Race is set to visit Cape Town once again as one of the twelve stop-over ports dur­ing the 2017/18 event as seven teams take to the seas in the ul­ti­mate ex­treme test of man- and wind­pow­ered ma­chine – mark­ing nine months of storms, speed, life-chang­ing sto­ries, stun­ning im­agery, and nail-bit­ing fin­ishes in an epic jour­ney around the world.

THE RACE

From Ali­cante all the way through to The Hague, the first leg of the race took place on 22 Oc­to­ber 2017 where the teams suc­cess­fully em­barked on their 45,000 nau­ti­cal mile jour­ney which will carry them across four oceans, touch­ing six con­ti­nents and vis­it­ing twelve host cities over nine months. The event fea­tures al­most three times as much South­ern Ocean rac­ing (around 12,500 nm) com­pared to re­cent edi­tions. Start­ing in Ali­cante, Lis­bon, and Cape Town, then onto Mel­bourne kick­ing off the 2018 side of the race. Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Auck­land, Ita­jaí, New­port, Cardiff, and Gothen­burg fol­low, with the race set to end in June 2018 in The Hague – the pop­u­lar city on the North Sea coast of the Nether­lands.

STOP-OVER IN CAPE TOWN

The boats are ex­pected to ar­rive in Cape Town, South Africa around 27 Novem­ber, al­low­ing the teams to step onto dry land for the first time in 6,300 nau­ti­cal miles, and af­ter three solid weeks at sea.

A trav­el­ling Race Vil­lage will open its doors to vis­i­tors on 24 Novem­ber 2017, al­low­ing lo­cal and in­ter­na­tional fans of the Volvo Ocean Race to ex­pe­ri­ence the thrill of ex­treme sail­ing, as well as an im­mer­sive take on Volvo Group – in­clud­ing some ex­cit­ing Volvo Cars mod­els.

THE YACHTS

The Volvo Ocean 65 mono­hull rac­ing yachts will again do duty in the 2017/18 edi­tion of the Volvo Ocean Race af­ter a de­ci­sion was made to im­prove cost­ef­fec­tive­ness and sus­tain­abil­ity by pro­duc­ing boats that would be suit­able for two rounds of the event rather than one. The de­ci­sion was also made to utilise a for­mula-based, One De­sign con­cept, which sees all eight teams rac­ing in iden­ti­cal boats de­signed by Farr Yacht De­sign, lead­ing to closer com­pe­ti­tion and pro­duc­ing re­sults based solely on sail­ing skill on the wa­ter rather than po­ten­tial de­sign and tech­ni­cal ad­van­tages.

FOR SUS­TAIN­ABIL­ITY

The race is putting sus­tain­abil­ity at its heart and fo­cus­ing on tak­ing ac­tion to help “Turn the Tide on Plas­tic” – the rapidly grow­ing and crit­i­cal prob­lem of plas­tic pol­lut­ing the world’s oceans, high­lighted by the United Na­tions En­vi­ron­ment’s Clean Seas cam­paign that is be­ing adopted by the Volvo Ocean Race.

There are three key pil­lars to the Volvo Ocean Race sus­tain­abil­ity strat­egy:

• To min­imise the race’s foot­print with a

par­tic­u­lar fo­cus on re­duc­ing; and • Where pos­si­ble, elim­i­nat­ing the use of sin­gle-use plas­tic by the teams and, in the Race Vil­lages;

• To max­imise the race’s im­pact us­ing its global com­mu­ni­ca­tions plat­form to spread aware­ness. This in­cludes an ed­u­ca­tional pro­gramme to change views, a science pro­gramme to cap­ture data while at sea and con­trib­ute to an un­der­stand­ing of the oceans in the most re­mote ar­eas of the planet, and to leave a pos­i­tive legacy wher­ever it goes.

Look­ing fur­ther ahead, the Volvo Ocean Race will use the One De­sign race boat plat­form to do ev­ery­thing pos­si­ble to re­duce and then elim­i­nate fos­sil fu­els on­board the boats in the fu­ture. The use of a hy­dro-gen­er­a­tor for the first time dur­ing the 2017/18 edi­tion should be a sig­nif­i­cant first step in re­duc­ing the use of fos­sil fu­els, with race man­age­ment able to man­date the use of the hy­dro-gen­er­a­tors by each team. Th­ese hy­dro-gen­er­a­tors pro­vide power to the on­board elec­tron­ics and com­mu­ni­ca­tion sys­tems.

IN HIS­TORY

The years 1973/74 saw the first edi­tion of the Volvo Ocean Race, where a to­tal of 19 teams trav­elled 27,000 nau­ti­cal miles around the world over four legs: from Portsmouth to Cape Town, to Sydney to Rio de Janeiro, and back to Portsmouth. Over­all, a to­tal of 167 boats have taken part in the 12 edi­tions of the race to date, in­clud­ing peo­ple from 43 dif­fer­ent na­tion­al­i­ties.

THE OUT­COME

In the pre­vi­ous edi­tion of the race, the Abu Dhabi Ocean Rac­ing team be­came the first team to win the dou­ble – se­cur­ing both the over­all tro­phy and the In-Port Race Se­ries.

How­ever, this time around, the out­come could in­deed be very dif­fer­ent, and as the race is still in its first stages, it re­mains very un­cer­tain. There has been some talk of teams us­ing dif­fer­ent modes or sail com­bi­na­tions than seen in the past, with Sun Hung Kai’s Luke Parkin­son sug­gest­ing the teams may have been hold­ing some things in re­serve. It’s early in the race, and each team is learn­ing new things as they go.

With the start be­hind them, the teams will set­tle into the rou­tine of life at sea, as they have be­gun the first leg of what will pri­mar­ily be a race around the planet. The in­ten­sity shown dur­ing the first hour of the first leg, when the fight was for ev­ery me­tre, demon­strates just how com­pet­i­tive the rest of this Volvo Ocean Race will be.

FROM ALI­CANTE ALL THE WAY THROUGH TO THE HAGUE,

THE FIRST LEG OF THE RACE TOOK PLACE ON 22 OC­TO­BER 2017 WHERE THE TEAMS SUC­CESS­FULLY EM­BARKED ON THEIR 45,000 NAU­TI­CAL MILE

JOUR­NEY.

Ves­tas 11th Hour Rac­ing

Team Turn the Tide on Plas­tic

Dongfeng Race Team

Team Sun Hung Kai Scal­ly­wag

Team Ak­zoNo­bel

Team Brunel

Team MAPFRE

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