THEY ARE BACK

The two South African Kwaito stars talk about their great come back in the in­dus­try.

Empowered Youth Magazine - - COVER STORY -

In 20 years, Mzambiya (Nkosi­nathi Zwane) and Msawawa (Si­bon­iso Dlamini) re­unite in style, hit­ting back into the in­dus­try with their first sin­gle, Imoto Ka Shukela. The two tal­ented kwaito stars rose into the mu­sic in­dus­try at very young ages as Mzambiya was only 11 years and Msawawa was 9 years old and be­came the youngest Kwaito artists in South Africa. They share with Em­pow­ered Youth what they have been up to and more of their mu­sic ca­reer.

THE BE­GIN­NING:

Mzambiya was dis­cov­ered by Nim­rod Nkosi in the days of Jam Al­ley and took on the mu­sic in­dus­try with his hit song “Kumele Sen­zeni”. Mak­ing it big as he was also fea­tured in Msawawa’s well-known hit song “Wawun­gakanani” as well as Mshoza’s “Kortes”.

The young stars made head­lines in the coun­try with their mag­nif­i­cent tal­ent and in­spired many young peo­ple who thought there were lim­its in go­ing for own dreams. “The only thing I wanted was just to be on stage and be­ing obe­di­ent to God’s call­ing. I have al­ways be­lieved that my be­ing pop­u­lar was not nec­es­sar­ily for me, but for chang­ing lives,” says Mzambiya. ”I am tremen­dously glad that I brought hope to many young peo­ple and have served my pur­pose”.

Whilst Mzambiya was in the trend, Msawawa also took the in­dus­try by storm with his hit,

Wawun­gakanani, in 2001, which is still our all-time favourite. Known for his jump­ing out of a sports bag, Msawawa has al­ways had his great ways of out­per­form­ing his el­der fel­low stars and scooped him­self a Metro FM Mu­sic Award for best new­comer cat­e­gory in 2002. “It ac­tu­ally played an epic role even though I did not know what was what as a young boy and I only cared about be­ing on tele­vi­sion,” says Msawawa. With their pas­sion and love for their mu­sic, the two stars gave the best to what their fans ex­pected, though they were young and did not know much of how it was. “For me, mu­sic is ac­tu­ally not busi­ness, but some­thing I have al­ways loved as I started as a dancer,” says Msawawa.

TAK­ING A BREAK FROM MU­SIC:

Af­ter so much recog­ni­tion and cre­at­ing them­selves big names, the two stars shifted off on break from mu­sic. Speak­ing about tak­ing a break from mu­sic, Mzambiya says he ven­tured into other busi­nesses and worked in the con­struc­tion in­dus­try for two years. “Life can throw a whole lot of things, but if you have a vi­sion, you can­not just fo­cus on one thing.” He was also priv­i­leged to work for Trans Africa Ra­dio as a con­tent pro­ducer in­tern and more op­por­tu­ni­ties came as he took over Jika Ma­jika on SABC 1 with Cas­san­dra Steingo af­ter Thembi Seete. The tal­ented Mzambiya re­turned in 2009 with a bang­ing al­bum ti­tled “Still I Rise”, which was pro­duced my Omen. “It was quite fruit­ful for me and my pro­duc­ers be­cause we re­ceived nom­i­na­tions for best kwaito al­bum and best mu­sic video along­side Houza and oth­ers.” He says. The am­bi­tious Msawawa re­lo­cated to Cler­mont to fo­cus on his busi­ness, although there were ru­mours spread around about his per­sonal life Msawawa never back­slid. “Prayer con­quers ev­ery­thing. With God, no neg­a­tiv­ity shall af­fect me. God has been there for me as I be­lieve in talk­ing to him through prayer “, he says. The 28 year old star has been run­ning his flour­ish­ing night­club called “Msawawa’s Cor­ner”, which he runs with his fam­ily. “My aim was to cre­ate some­thing for the fam­ily and it worked be­cause my par­ents man­age the busi­ness Ef­fec­tively,” he says. He also cre­ated job op­por­tu­ni­ties for his com­mu­nity res­i­dents.

BACK IN THE GAME:

The two stars re­cently re­leased their sin­gle ti­tled “Imoto Ka

Shukela”, which is not kwaito, but gqom. Asked about the re­union, Mzambiya tells Em­pow­ered Youth that it has been 20 years since their col­lab­o­ra­tion af­ter Wawun­gaka nani, which took the na­tion by storm. “I just thought it would be nice to link up with him as we had not seen each other for years. I then spoke to Bra Os­car and he loved the idea, though he had a very hec­tic sched­ule, he gave it a chance,” he says. Msawawa says it is by the grace of God that they are back with this amaz­ing of­fer. The two stars have many great trans­la­tions and em­pha­sis on what the song ac­tu­ally means. Msawawa es­tab­lished a foun­da­tion called “Msawawa Youth Char­ity foun­da­tion” which aims at giv­ing back to the com­mu­nity and help­ing those with tal­ents grow. “As we are now in win­ter, we will be choos­ing one school that we will do­nate jer­seys,” he says. Msawawa tells Em­pow­ered Youth that he is known as just a mu­si­cian, but there are many other things that he does. Mzambiya tells Em­pow­ered Youth that he will be re­leas­ing his last sin­gle and will there­after fo­cus more on pro­duc­ing.

NKOSI­NATHI AND SI­BON­ISO ARE NOT JUST MU­SI­CIANS, BUT BUSI­NESS­MEN. THEY ARE KNOWN FOR BE­ING THE FEW EVER PRO­DUCED KWAITO CHILD STARS.

From left: Young Mzambiya and Msawawa

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