OPTOMETRIST.

Empowered Youth Magazine - - EMPOWERED CAREER -

Tshuku is a qual­i­fied Optometrist whose fo­cus lies at mak­ing sure that her pa­tients leave the con­sul­ta­tion room with a smile on their face. Very vi­brant and hum­bled Tshuku gives us an in­sight into her ca­reer life as an Optometrist.

WHAT IS IT THAT MANY PEO­PLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT BE­ING AN OPTOMETRIST?

Be­ing an Optometrist is more than just giv­ing pa­tients spec­ta­cles, they study at uni­ver­si­ties for years be­fore they qual­ify to ex­am­ine the eyes. As Op­tometrists, we need to ex­am­ine the eyes us­ing the suit­able equip­ment that helps per­form the process ef­fec­tively and ef­fi­ciently.

AC­CORD­ING TO YOU, WHAT IS MORE IM­POR­TANT WHEN GET­TING INTO THIS CA­REER FIELD?

Pas­sion, love, care, and de­ter­mi­na­tion. One must be pas­sion­ate about peo­ple’s eyes and their health as a whole.

YOUR FIRST YEAR WORK­ING AS AN OPTOMETRIST, HOW WAS IT LIKE?

The first few months were quite hec­tic and chal­leng­ing. Alone I had to see pa­tience and make all fi­nal de­ci­sions by my­self un­like in var­sity when we al­ways had a su­per­vi­sor with. As time went on, I started be­liev­ing in my judge­ments from the good work I was do­ing as pa­tience would come and leave with sat­is­fac­tion, also the treat­ment do­ing well.

BEST HIGH­LIGHTS OF YOUR CA­REER SINCE YOU STARTED TO DATE.

Work­ing in a pub­lic health­care fa­cil­ity where I get to visit pub­lic schools and old age homes for screen­ing. I also get to or­ga­nize and at­tend health cam­paign screen­ing. Be­ing a vol­un­teer for spe­cial Olympic South Africa (Open­ing eyes) where we travel to spe­cial schools across the coun­try to screen peo­ple with in­tel­lec­tual dis­abil­i­ties.

ARE YOU AN OPTOMETRIST WHEN AT HOME OR OUT WITH FRIENDS? IN CASE SOME­ONE GETS INTO TROU­BLE WITH THEIR EYES?

Of course, I am. My fam­ily al­ways call me when­ever there is some­thing wrong with their eyes. I am in­deed an Optometrist even over the phone. As for my friends, many of them saved me as “Optometrist”. They usu­ally re­port to me when they ex­pe­ri­ence some­thing they be­lieve is wrong to their eyes. (She laughs)

WHAT AD­VICE CAN YOU GIVE TO SOME­ONE WHO WANTS TO BE IN THE SAME FIELD AS YOU?

Do it be­cause you love it and pas­sion­ate about it so that when things be­come tough, you can hold on with the same love you have for be­ing in the in­dus­try. Do­ing some­thing out of love is very com­pul­sory and makes one earn the top level of be­ing an ex­pert in what­ever field they are in.

HOW MUCH TIME DO YOU TAKE TO PRE­PARE YOUR DAY BE­FORE SEE­ING PA­TIENTS?

I think I am al­ways ready. With all the equip­ment in the con­sul­ta­tion room, all I need is to plug, switch on and ex­am­ine the pa­tient.

WHO IS YOUR ROLE MODEL IN THE FIELD?

Ausi Emma Rapoo. (May her soul con­tinue to rest in peace), my for­mer man­ager. Dur­ing my var­sity life when I was work­ing at Torga Op­ti­cal, Cresta Mall as a stu­dent, though she was not an Optometrist, she taught me so much about this field and life in gen­eral. I re­mem­ber her mo­ti­vat­ing me that if she could do it, I could do it too. Not that we can re­place our role mod­els, Ms. Faith Chabedi is also a role model to me. She in­tro­duced me to the Spe­cial Olympics South Africa.

Mmat­shukudu Molepo is proud to be an Optometrist as she has got love for the field.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.