En­tre­pre­neur school

Finweek English Edition - - COVER STORY -

– be­gin­ning at pri­mary school and go­ing through to univer­sity… If you start teach­ing a six-year-old about en­trepreneur­ship, you will have a much bet­ter chance at success than try­ing to ori­en­tate an adult to­wards it.” He adds: “There are three el­e­ments to an en­trepreneur­ship pro­gram: at­ti­tude; skill; and mo­ti­va­tion – with at­ti­tude be­ing the start­ing point. The skills el­e­ment should in­cor­po­rate op­por­tu­nity recog­ni­tion and ideation – which in­volves con­vert­ing ideas into vi­able busi­ness ideas, ie com­mer­cial­i­sa­tion. In many in­stances, the miss­ing el­e­ment in ex­ist­ing pro­grams is around scale: teach­ing stu­dents how to de­velop an idea and then scale it.”

Hay­ley Good­win Parry, founder of The Money School, be­lieves there is cer­tainly a need for an in­sti­tu­tion that would teach th­ese types of crit­i­cal skills. “As an en­tre­pre­neur my­self, there are def­i­nitely short cour­ses I’d be in­ter­ested in at­tend­ing to shore up knowl­edge in ar­eas where I know we could use some help,” she says. “The as­so­ci­ated ben­e­fits of such an en­vi­ron­ment – net­work­ing, con­tacts and “An en­trepreneur­ship school needs to be fully in­te­grated – be­gin­ning at pri­mary school and go­ing through to univer­sity… If you start teach­ing a six-year- old about en­trepreneur­ship, you will have a much bet­ter chance at success than try­ing to ori­en­tate an adult to­wards it.” tried and trusted sys­tems and pro­cesses that other en­trepreneurs could piggy-back off of – could be enor­mously ben­e­fi­cial.”

With re­gard to the shape and form that a lo­cal en­trepreneurs’ school would take, Parry ad­vises look­ing abroad for in­spi­ra­tion: “I’d look to learn from sim­i­larly suc­cess­ful ini­tia­tives around the world and even part­ner with some of them where it makes sense,” she says.

“There is a need for ba­sic tem­plates for en­trepreneurs look­ing to get things off the ground – from part­ner­ship agree­ments, to NDAs (non-dis­clo­sure agree­ments) and how to trade­mark your com­pany name for ex­am­ple – all the way through to man­ag­ing a start-up prod­uct/ser­vice in the ev­er­chang­ing so­cial me­dia space.”

Above all, an en­trepreneur­ship school should seek to in­stil that cov­eted ‘cul­ture’ of en­trepreneur­ship and in­no­va­tion, which only f lour­ishes in cer­tain en­vi­ron­ments. “En­trepreneur­ship is a think­ing dis­ci­pline – it is not a dis­crete set of skills – rather, it’s a spe­cific way of be­ing in the world,” adds Marks.

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